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stowintegrity

Does your company employ a regimented service/followup program?

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If we took the time to share the details of our business processes, I think we'd see that there are a lot simiarities. However, I'm also convinced that our "step-by-step" processes contain some stark differences, because we all do things that we think are in our own best interest, so policy & procedures are put in place where it makes sense for us individually.

 

What does your service & followup program look like? Do you have a documented process for greeting & taking care of your customers? What does it look like? What things do you do in this regard that show you the results you want?

 

At our shop, we are continually trying to document our processes. We like our service staff to answer the phone a particular way because they quickly learn the difference it makes to our customers. Our technicians are told from the beginning that no conversations can be had with the front office about any service/repair concern unless they have the job ticket in their hand, and they've already (in shorthand) documented the problem they uncovered that needs addressed. Furthermore, no one in our company is allowed to refer to the car or the service when bringing up issues with the repair. We refer to "MR. SMITH'S" concerns, not the "WATER PUMP JOB", or the "FORD TAURUS". A small tweak...but one that has made an incredible difference in our operation, and especially in the lives of our customers.

 

These are only a handful of small things we find important, that we think make a difference. I'm hoping some of you will share a brief description of the greeting, service, and followup process you use in your shop. Maybe we're doing something that makes sense to one of you, and you can find it helpful. Maybe there's something one of you are doing that makes sense to us, and can help us.

 

So how aggressive are you in contacting or communicating service proposals with your prospects? What are you doing "in-house" that's making an incredible difference in your business?

 

Just one man's hopeful request.

Edited by stowintegrity

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