Quantcast
Jump to content


New part failure and labor issues


Recommended Posts

Anyone else experiencing a high number of new part fails? We have fails across the board, sensors, window motors, electrical (starter, alternator) and untold number of squeaky brakes. We use ceramic almost exclusively unless it's a cost factor for customers, do new rotors 98% of the time and it doesn't matter which vendor I purchase from - I get a large number of complaints from customers that the brakes are squeaking sometimes in as little as 1 month.?!?!?

Brakes are installed properly and greased appropriately.

 

Some weeks we feel like all were are working on are re-dos.

 

In the past, we haven't charged customer for part failures. It's not our fault, but it's certainly not theirs. Big labor jobs would get a labor claim sent into vendor. We hardly ever see anything close to full reimbursement if we see anything at all.

 

After the last few months, partner I decided customers need to pay labor at 50% reduced rate. Again, not their fault - but not ours either. We can't keep doing this without getting paid something for our time. Thinking of adding disclaimer on invoice stating this policy.

We feel for the customer, but we can't keep doing them for nothing with such a high rate of failures.

 

Just wondering if anyone else is running into this problem and how you are handling it?

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

no offense but i would find another shop to do my repairs if i was billed for you not finding me good parts, you said it yourself, you use ceramic unless its a cost factor....

 

What brand? And you find 98% of the brake rotors are below spec or will be after resurfacing? Thats ALLOT.

 

What brand of brake pads do you use?

 

We use Centric and almost never have them come back on us. In Houston, we have high humidity that will literally rust the rotors overnight which will cause squeaking once or twice when first start driving. Its no cause for replacement. Other than that i cant remember the last brake job that came back. I would suspect your brake lathe being an issue but it doesnt sound like it gets much use, lol.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to have a conversation with your vendor. There are plenty of good aftermarket brake pads, but your gonna have to pay the price for them. Like Imcca said, if I was your customer and you wanted to charge me for a parts failure within whatever your warranty period is, I would be looking for a new shop to take care of my vehicles. We are a NAPA AutoCare shop and we use mostly NAPA premium parts. We see an occasional part failure(mostly rotating electrical or steering racks) that we will submit labor claims on, but no brake issues. We do use the Adaptive One brake pads on almost all our brake jobs. We do a 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty on all repairs and have almost zero warranty issues.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You also need to take a look at the brake work your techs are doing. One of the biggest no no's I've seen is pad ends being ground down to fit in the brackets and abutment hardware, even by well know shops. I assume you're in a salt zone as I am and one of the problems I see on a daily basis is rust buildup behind the hardware which starts to pinch the pads and sticks them in the brackets. Hardware needs to be removed and all rust cleaned off the brackets. I have several methods but my favorite is to use the sand blast cabinet. Once the rust is gone I treat that surface, grease it and install new hardware and then the pads will fit perfect, not too tight and not too loose. I assume you're greasing the pad ends and or abutment hardware, glide pins as well as the caliper piston end and opposite side contact areas. In the four years I've owned my shop I have never had a brake job come back for squealing, and I do a crap ton of brake work.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We almost exclusively use after market brake pads and our comebacks for brake work are less than 5%. I agree with others that you have to find a good brand and also make sure technicians are doing proper brake repairs.

 

us too, we never use OE and have great success.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You also need to take a look at the brake work your techs are doing. One of the biggest no no's I've seen is pad ends being ground down to fit in the brackets and abutment hardware, even by well know shops. I assume you're in a salt zone as I am and one of the problems I see on a daily basis is rust buildup behind the hardware which starts to pinch the pads and sticks them in the brackets. Hardware needs to be removed and all rust cleaned off the brackets. I have several methods but my favorite is to use the sand blast cabinet. Once the rust is gone I treat that surface, grease it and install new hardware and then the pads will fit perfect, not too tight and not too loose. I assume you're greasing the pad ends and or abutment hardware, glide pins as well as the caliper piston end and opposite side contact areas. In the four years I've owned my shop I have never had a brake job come back for squealing, and I do a crap ton of brake work.

 

 

 

Scotty hit the nail on the head. If you are having that kind return rate your techs are not doing the job right. Brake rotors need to be replaced or machined on every job, piston travel checked, and if you can't move the pads in the brackets with pinky pressure there is something wrong. Pads should never be ground down, if they stick its a bracket problem. Every brake job should be test driven. If you are using any decent brand aftermarket pad you will be ok. Most warehouses carry a cheap rotor/pad line avoid it. Using brands like Wagner, Textar, Akebono, Jurid, Centric, Sebro ect will net you great performance. Remember even the most basic brake job is at least 40 mins or more for a top tech. That's why the labor guide gives you an hour an a half or better for most jobs. If techs are doing jobs in 20 mins they are not doing the job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only comment on the brake pad issue is that some pads do have excessive epoxy on the end that needs to be cleaned. We bead blast every bracket that will come off and clean the others to bar metal if possible. Still get the ocassional pad you'll need to take a razor knife or grinder to knock the epoxy off for a clean fit.

 

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

Edited by ncautoshop
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Here too...We use mostly aftermarket parts across the board and have a fairly low part failure. on top of that we make sure that who ever our main vendors are pay the complete labor dollars that we charge to the customer. for instance....if we replace a wheel bearing for $275 labor price...we make sure I vendor credits us for the part and pays the full $275 in labor cost.

We who run our independent repair shops have only our reputation....so IF we have parts failure comeback, we pay for a rental, give free oil changes for inconveniences and so on..that can easily cost more than the $65-$100 labor rate... so we say, if the vendor CANT pay a $200-$300 labor claim once every 2-4 months...tell them you will find a parts vendor that will gladly pay those labor claims to get your $40k to $75k or whatever it is you spend with them. that's what we do....

 

That's just my opinion.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here too...We use mostly aftermarket parts across the board and have a fairly low part failure. on top of that we make sure that who ever our main vendors are pay the complete labor dollars that we charge to the customer. for instance....if we replace a wheel bearing for $275 labor price...we make sure I vendor credits us for the part and pays the full $275 in labor cost.

We who run our independent repair shops have only our reputation....so IF we have parts failure comeback, we pay for a rental, give free oil changes for inconveniences and so on..that can easily cost more than the $65-$100 labor rate... so we say, if the vendor CANT pay a $200-$300 labor claim once every 2-4 months...tell them you will find a parts vendor that will gladly pay those labor claims to get your $40k to $75k or whatever it is you spend with them. that's what we do....

 

That's just my opinion.

 

 

I wish that were the case around me. I do not believe any part vendors offer to pay ANY warranty on labor at all which is sad when I pay over $7000 in parts weekly on average.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I wish that were the case around me. I do not believe any part vendors offer to pay ANY warranty on labor at all which is sad when I pay over $7000 in parts weekly on average.

please understand...no one here in Michigan Offers that to us, we tell them...if they want our business that's the way it has to be....

Im sure there is a vendor near you that would LOVE your $30,000 a month. minus a few labor claims a year....Im just saying.

Edited by NorthernMike
Link to comment
Share on other sites

you would be surprised. I have 2 options for my go to parts which is Northside Imports and WorldPac. Both give me nothing. WorldPac starting giving me SOME freebies but to get them to agree to any type of warranty claim payouts would be a dream. They won't even fix my delivery route. I am in between 2 warehouses and 1 of them is about a 15 minute drive. I explain to them that they are losing out on 20k in sales a month. Falls on def ears.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you would be surprised. I have 2 options for my go to parts which is Northside Imports and WorldPac. Both give me nothing. WorldPac starting giving me SOME freebies but to get them to agree to any type of warranty claim payouts would be a dream. They won't even fix my delivery route. I am in between 2 warehouses and 1 of them is about a 15 minute drive. I explain to them that they are losing out on 20k in sales a month. Falls on def ears.

I guess being mostly German cars you are at a disadvantage for parts...I didn't think about that.

 

On a different note. how do you like worldpac. we are thinking about using them for our import parts. are they reasonably priced.....I will tell they seem as if they could care less if we sign up with them or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess being mostly German cars you are at a disadvantage for parts...I didn't think about that.

 

On a different note. how do you like worldpac. we are thinking about using them for our import parts. are they reasonably priced.....I will tell they seem as if they could care less if we sign up with them or not.

 

 

They definitely value you us as customers however there arent very many freebies from them even though they are the biggest importer of european parts. I would say if you have a warehouse that can actually perform daily deliveries its definitely a good supplier to have. They have a lot of OE parts that are hard to come by. If you need to have parts shipped to you I would look into SSF based in california or Northside Imports

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

They definitely value you us as customers however there arent very many freebies from them even though they are the biggest importer of european parts. I would say if you have a warehouse that can actually perform daily deliveries its definitely a good supplier to have. They have a lot of OE parts that are hard to come by. If you need to have parts shipped to you I would look into SSF based in california or Northside Imports

 

Do you use SSF at all?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Do you use SSF at all?

i have an account with them with the intention of giving them some business. However them being on the West coast and me on the east it becomes hard with the shipping charges and such. Nice looking site and lots of inventory. I like the ethos of the company as well, seems like they are much more customer centric

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All of the chain stores here pay labor up to a reasonable amount. I buy a lot from a regional supplier that does not offer labor claims.

 

It use to be the part markup was the built in labor claim. As the industry has gotten more expensive, the part markup fund gets reallocated to other costs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Changing The Industry
      Reacting To A Viral TikTok On The Cost of Auto Repair
    • By carmcapriotto
      Welcome to another episode of the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosted by Brian and Kim Walker! 
      Today, we have a very special guest, Michael Doherty, who was our exceptional service advisor at Peak Automotive in Apex, North Carolina. 
      Michael has been a pivotal figure in our journey, and we are thrilled to share his insights on customer loyalty and retention. He’ll discuss his unique approach to building lasting client relationships and the importance of genuine care and transparency.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      WorldPac - https://www.wtitraining.com/
      Worldpac STX - https://automotivetrainingevents.com/event/stx/
      Traver Technologies: https://traverconnect.com/
      ShopWare - https://shop-ware.com/
      How To Get In Touch
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected] 
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thank you to our friends at RepairPal for providing you this episode. As shop owners we were part of RepairPal’s Certified network and you can learn more at RepairPal.com/shops.
      Customer loyalty programs are crucial for retaining clients in the auto repair industry. On the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosts Brian and Kim Walker explore this topic with Joe Schindler and Jeff Rudnick. 
      Joe, a shop owner, shares his experiences with loyalty programs, while Jeff from Pit Crew Marketing offers insights on how these programs can significantly benefit automotive shops. 
      This discussion is part of their ongoing series on customer retention. They highlight how personalized rewards, first impressions, and community involvement can build stronger customer relationships, encouraging repeat business and long-term loyalty. These strategies significantly enhance customer satisfaction and drive business growth.
      Show Notes with Timestamps
      The introduction (00:00:03) Introduction of the podcast episode and the topic of customer loyalty programs. Jeff's background in Hawaii (00:01:03) Jeff's background in Hawaii and the discussion about his current location. Defining customer loyalty (00:04:19) Discussion on the definition of customer loyalty and how it is measured. Earning trust and loyalty (00:06:01) The importance of trust in earning customer loyalty and the significance of knowing the customer's intent. First impressions (00:12:00) The impact of the first impression on building customer loyalty and the significance of creating a welcoming environment. Last interaction and lagniappe (00:18:05) The importance of the last interaction with the customer and the concept of providing a little extra (lagniappe) to enhance the customer experience. Community involvement and charity events (00:20:34) The role of community involvement and charity events in creating customer loyalty and building relationships. These are the main topics covered in the podcast episode transcription segment, organized in chronological order with their respective timestamps. Community Involvement Charity (00:22:26) Shop owner's initiative to involve customers in community charity, raising funds and providing incentives for customers. Supporting Little League Teams (00:23:20) Discussion on sponsoring little league teams, the impact on the community, and the importance of community involvement. Seizing Opportunities (00:24:29) Encouragement to shop owners to seize opportunities, think creatively, and take advantage of moments for business growth. Solving Real Problems (00:25:44) Emphasizing the role of marketing in solving real challenges for small businesses and making their lives better. Involvement in the Community (00:27:31) Discussion on the importance of being involved in the community and creating a sense of belonging, impacting marketing positively. Connecting with Customers (00:28:36) Emphasizing the need to connect with customers in a meaningful way, beyond traditional loyalty programs, and the impact on advertising effectiveness. Fundraising Logistics (00:29:46) Exploring the logistics of fundraising, including tools, graphics, and collaboration with marketing companies for seamless integration. Using Rewards for Community Programs (00:36:29) Discussion on customers choosing to use rewards for community programs, the intrinsic value, and setting up guardrails for giving. Launching Shop Programs (00:41:39) The process of launching shop programs, integration with shop management systems, and activating accounts based on customer history. Service Advisor's Role (00:45:37) Reference to a previous episode discussing the service advisor's role in customer retention and the impact of the 1-to-1 service advisor-technician ratio. Joe's thoughtful gifting (00:46:31) Joe explains his thoughtful and considerate gifting strategies to connect with clients and nurture relationships. Partners with systems and processes (00:47:22) Joe emphasizes the importance of having partners with efficient systems and processes to ease the burden on business owners. Inexpensive customer gifts (00:48:37) Joe shares his inexpensive yet impactful gift ideas for customers, including hot chocolate mixers, cookies, and personalized items. Quality over quantity (00:51:20) Joe discusses the significance of giving high-quality, thoughtful gifts over cheap trinkets and the impact it has on customers. Building customer loyalty (00:53:17) Joe emphasizes the importance of little gestures and thoughtful gifts in building customer loyalty and creating a positive impact. Conclusion and contact information (00:54:02) The hosts express gratitude to the guests and provide their contact information for listeners to get in touch.  
      How To Get In Touch
       
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      Pit Crew Marketing
      Schindler's Garage
      Schindler's Garage - see loyalty program posts
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Changing The Industry
      Episode 171 - Solving Network Problems and Diagnosing Car Issues with Electrical Guru David Barden
    • By carmcapriotto
      In this episode of the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosts Brian and Kim Walker are joined by Rena Rennebohm to discuss the crucial role of service advisors in customer retention. Part of a customer retention series, this conversation highlights the importance of tailored, one-on-one service advisor training. Key topics include the shop owner's role in setting expectations, the benefits of a one-to-one advisor-to-technician ratio, and common mistakes in advisor interactions. Rena emphasizes the need for clear communication, empathy, and consistent follow-up to build trust and enhance customer loyalty, ultimately driving better business outcomes.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      How To Get In Touch
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      Rena Rennebohm: [email protected]
      Website: empoweryouradvisor.com
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...