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marista

New part failure and labor issues

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Anyone else experiencing a high number of new part fails? We have fails across the board, sensors, window motors, electrical (starter, alternator) and untold number of squeaky brakes. We use ceramic almost exclusively unless it's a cost factor for customers, do new rotors 98% of the time and it doesn't matter which vendor I purchase from - I get a large number of complaints from customers that the brakes are squeaking sometimes in as little as 1 month.?!?!?

Brakes are installed properly and greased appropriately.

 

Some weeks we feel like all were are working on are re-dos.

 

In the past, we haven't charged customer for part failures. It's not our fault, but it's certainly not theirs. Big labor jobs would get a labor claim sent into vendor. We hardly ever see anything close to full reimbursement if we see anything at all.

 

After the last few months, partner I decided customers need to pay labor at 50% reduced rate. Again, not their fault - but not ours either. We can't keep doing this without getting paid something for our time. Thinking of adding disclaimer on invoice stating this policy.

We feel for the customer, but we can't keep doing them for nothing with such a high rate of failures.

 

Just wondering if anyone else is running into this problem and how you are handling it?

 

 

 

 

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