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Employee Productivity help!

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We have a lot of work that needs to be done but our employees just take their time on jobs and realllllly stretch it out instead of working faster and getting the job done so they can move onto the next one. They are payed hourly and I think that is part of the problem. We do custom work and our jobs are usually pretty random so I cant pay them by the job. Any suggestions?

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