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alfredauto

mercedes diesel help needed

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I've got a 99 e300td I bought at auction, 160k miles, looks like a new car. It starts up easily at -30* and will run right up to redline easily. Here's the issue; at part throttle cruising about 50mph with cruise control on it will hesitate a bit and plume blue smoke out the tailpipe. Driving it with a heavy foot it never smokes. The hesitation is barely noticeable, but the smoke is. I changed the oil and filter with no improvement. Any help is appreciated.

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