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Boss away, employees play.

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Anyone else encounter this problem? I get the feeling as of though when I am out of the shop or "trying" to take a day off, the techs and mechanics seem to not act the same and relay different information to customers than when I am personally there. My manager does not seem like the type of person to push people to work when i am not there, but does when I am.

 

Wait times for diagnostics are quoted longer, customers wait longer and many just leave since we "don't have the parts" yet we usually just order them from a local parts store when I am there. Cell phone use has also sky rocketed which I cannot stand!

 

How would you handle this?

 

I appreciate all your thoughts and opinions in advance.

 

Thanks!

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