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mspecperformance

How do you turn "projects" or hard diagnostic problems away or into $$$?

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Wanted to get your take on this...

 

We seem to get a lot of decently tough diagnostic work. This ranges from Engine issues, electrical, unknown collision damage etc.

 

We are more than capable of finding out most issues however with diagnostics there never is a flat rate. As we know, people HATE HATE HATE buying something that isn't tangible. Repairs alone are something they can't necessarily feel or touch. Diagnostics is a step lower on the ladder where us as repair shops are not repairing anything, just finding out what the problem is. We find sometimes it takes us hours maybe days to track down a problem. If we actually charged true time spent on a vehicle sometimes ROs can come out to the thousands. How do you go about selling and billing this?

 

I've had customers authorize block times (3-5 hours of diag time) with mixed results. If we still don't find the problem within that time no matter what they agree to they are down right pissed off about paying anything even after being fully aware that there is no guarantee. Maybe they were the wrong type of customer in the first place I don't know.

 

I find it becomes more of a burden than good business to work on these vehicles. Are these hard diag problems worth just passing along? How do you go about doing that without coming across to the customer like you don't know what your doing?

 

 

I contemplate every day how I can just run a suspension/alignment/brake shop and get consistent business LOL. That would be heaven sent!

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