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It seems like I have a thousand tools for so many different purposes, a certain ratchet for this bolt and different ratchet for that bolt. It seems also now that I have gotten that way with flashlights. A flashlight for working in the interior, A huge light that attaches to the hood when doing engine repair, a pocket flashlight, a flashlight to do a quick and safety check over the vehicle during routine service, a drop chord light when working underneath the car, and maybe a couple more stashed somewhere. Does anyone else have this problem?

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