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Joe Marconi

Motorists Delay Safety-Related Repairs ?

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I think we can all agree that many motorists put off preventive maintenance, especially the last few years during the recession. But what about safety-related repairs? A recent study taken by ForeverCar.com (an extended warranty provider), found that people were more interested in repairs to their air conditioner, DVD players, GPS and sound systems.

 

This is a little surprise to me. We do a fair amount of extended warranty, and found that if the customer thinks something is covered, they want to take advantage of the coverage, no matter what the repair is.

 

I do agree that it is easier to sell air conditioner repairs on a hot day than tires or brakes.

 

What are you seeing?

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