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Joe Marconi

Work Flow: It’S More Than What Happens In The Bays

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Workflow: It’s more than what happens in the bays

 

Most of us, due to our mechanical background, have no issues with creating a workflow process that maximizes productivity and efficiency, once a job is sold. Where many of us fall short is involving the customer in that workflow process.

 

Workflow involves more than what is managed through the shop, it’s also how the customer is managed through the entire sales process; from appointment scheduling, to write up, to up sell, to car delivery and the follow up after the sale. If any of the steps are not consistent with your delivery of world class service, the business will suffer with low productivity, low sales and poor retention rate.

 

Each contact point with the customer is an opportunity to either make a positive experience or negative experience. The more positive impressions we make, the greater the emotional tie with the customer and the stronger the business.

 

Remember, the customer is the most important element in your workflow process. Build a process that delivers world class customer service with the awareness that you are doing all you can to take care of the customer’s needs.

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