Quantcast
Jump to content


Joe Marconi

Work Flow: It’S More Than What Happens In The Bays

Recommended Posts

Workflow: It’s more than what happens in the bays

 

Most of us, due to our mechanical background, have no issues with creating a workflow process that maximizes productivity and efficiency, once a job is sold. Where many of us fall short is involving the customer in that workflow process.

 

Workflow involves more than what is managed through the shop, it’s also how the customer is managed through the entire sales process; from appointment scheduling, to write up, to up sell, to car delivery and the follow up after the sale. If any of the steps are not consistent with your delivery of world class service, the business will suffer with low productivity, low sales and poor retention rate.

 

Each contact point with the customer is an opportunity to either make a positive experience or negative experience. The more positive impressions we make, the greater the emotional tie with the customer and the stronger the business.

 

Remember, the customer is the most important element in your workflow process. Build a process that delivers world class customer service with the awareness that you are doing all you can to take care of the customer’s needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • By Zs Automotive
      Hi, everyone
       
      I just opened an auto repair shop about 4 months ago, but I'm still working my full time job as a tech therefore I open the shop from 4 pm until 9pm M-F and 8-5 on Saturday. I'm starting to build customers but most are from referrals and neighbors I don't get much traffic cars. I'm starting to think that the hours I'm open don't really work for the auto repair business seems like after 6 everything dies. Has anyone worked this kind of hours or what do you guys think about this odd hours.
    • By Gonzo
      The Ghost Mechanic
               Creepier things have happened, but rarely do things go without an explanation.  This time around it’s the mystery mechanic who seems to have been working on this guy’s car, or maybe not.  Maybe it’s that ghostly mechanic who haunts people’s cars on quiet neighborhood streets in the middle of the night. You know, that guy who leaves nothing but telltale greasy finger prints or unattached wire harnesses, or even loose bolts where loose bolts shouldn’t be. This job was no exception to the antics of the invisible mechanic’s handy work. It’s a mystery worth solving.
               A Chevy HHR was towed in for a no start condition.  It wasn’t exactly a no start; it was more like a poor starting/running condition. When it would run, the poor thing sounded like it was on its last trip to the garage and its first trip to the salvage yard.  Trying to beat it to its last ride on the tow truck, I hooked up the scanner to see what inner mysteries were present.  Code P1682 (Ignition 1 switch circuit 2), but I wasn’t done yet. Time to do a complete health check on all the modules.  Sure enough, the ‘U’ codes were off the charts.  Seems we have a lot of low voltage codes causing a problem. 
               A quick check of the wiring diagram showed the power led to a voltage input lead for the PCM, TCM, and several other circuits that would definitely lead to a rough, hard to start, non-cooperating HHR. This may turn out to be a simple problem after all.  Could be wiring, a component, or perhaps a fuse box problem.  A quick glance at the fuse box didn’t reveal much, but I should probably take a closer look at that fuse box.  Maybe go as far as physically checking the actual fuse circuit.  Hmm, something is amiss here. The fuse is good, but the fuse is in the wrong slot. The slot that it’s in should be an empty slot. Seems somebody was fooling around under the hood and didn’t put the fuse back correctly.   
               Might as well try moving the fuse back to the proper location.  Well, imagine that, this old HHR starts right up!  OK, it’s not running the best . . . yet.  Do a little throttle relearn and it runs as good as new.
               After rechecking the related circuits for any damage, or out of place items I gave the HHR the once around the block test.  Runs great, sounds great, no warning lights, no unusual noises, seems fine to me.  I guess I’ll write up an invoice on this job and call the customer.  As I closed the hood, the telltale greasy hand prints from the last guy who was under the hood were everywhere.  I think I spent as much time cleaning this guy’s hood as I spent diagnosing the problem.
      I gave him a call and explained to him, as best I could, what I had found. Although, I did have that one nagging question regarding who had worked on the car previously. I really wanted an answer to that question.  
      "NOBODY" … are you serious?  That’s when I explained the entire repair all over again.  Between the greasy finger marks on the hood and fenders, and the fuse in the wrong place, I’m afraid I’m not going to buy the story that the mysterious ghost mechanic has struck again. His only explanation came down to the whole thing must have been a poltergeist or something. Or ‘someone’ not ‘something’ is a better way to put it.  I’m not buying the ghost mechanic theory. At this point, he seemed to be more intent on finding out the final bill, and not so much on solving the mystery of how the fuse mysteriously moved into a different slot.
      But, before I gave him the total, I recommended he perform an exorcism on his car, since ‘NOBODY’ has been touching it.  His response, "How much more will that cost me?” Seriously? Now, I’ve been asked to do all sorts of things to a car, like put a helicopter landing pad on the roof, remove a varmint from behind the dash, or turn a Prius into a tow truck, but I don’t think I’ve ever been explicitly asked to do an exorcism on the family truckster.  Actually, I’m starting to put this whole thing together. 
      The mystery mechanic is none other than this guy himself.  His answers to certain questions, and how he told his story were a dead giveaway as to who the ghost mechanic was. I swear some people just can’t be honest and admit when they’re beyond their learning curve.  We both might have had a good laugh over the whole thing, but instead this guy wants me to drop the price in half, since it was such an ‘easy’ repair and all, and ignore the whereabouts of this seemingly ghostly apparition with the mindless ability to screw up the family car. But, since this guy wouldn’t own up to it, even with the evidence of his very own greasy paw prints, he’s in for a lesson of honesty, awareness of his own abilities, and how to pay for a professional diagnosis.
      It’s just another case of the mechanic solving the mystery of the proverbial ghost mechanic.  Debunking wives’A tales about the modern automobile, supernatural occurrences under the hood, and apparitions that seem to move fuses around is just another duty of the modern mechanic. Oh, and don’t think you’re the first person who’s tried the ghost mechanic as your method of passing the blame… you’re not.  Every good mechanic has performed their fair share of exorcisms in the past and have seen the results of the mystery mechanic and his endeavors.  We know who you really are.

      View full article
    • By litljenarey
      We are leasing a 5 bay shop in a beautiful area of a Florida retirement mecca. We fall under all sorts of local noise, color, sign, and architectural restrictions. Truthfully, the place is quite attractive. The bays doors face the main street and the office/waiting room faces a side street with public parking.
      We haven't opened yet but we already have customers stopping by to chat and ask questions every time the bays are open.
      The previous shop was one man show who did it all in the first bay. He kept the "front" door locked.
      Now it's on me to re-train the customers that they can't enter the shop, stand under the lifts, chat with the tech, smoke cigars, use the techs bathroom, or park use the street parking as long term boat/rv/limo storage.
      The insurance underwriter is wanting yellow plastic safety chains and red "do not enter" type signs. I don't really like that look.
       
      So what does everyone else do to prevent or discourage customers from just walking into your bays?
       
      Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk
       
       
    • By Dnzauto
      Dear fellow Repair People,
      We are in need of an additional closeby location to our current shop, mostly to service some of our fleets and overload for the time being. ( We will start reorganizing and a major update on our shop sometime in the next 12 months, so we will definitely use the 2nd location more during that time). I believe we can live with 2 bays and 6 additional parking spots. We will NOT open at night or Sundays or weird stuff like that. We have excellent reputation and the team that will work in this remote location has been together for over 5 years now, they are super knowledgeable, nice and honest people. We will never interact with your customers or techs, and same is expected from you. Whenever you need help, we will be happy to help!
       
      We will sign a lease/sublease for 12 months with 2 six month options. Who knows, we might keep it even longer depending on the fleet work.
      If the bays do NOT have lifts, that is NOT a problem! We can purchase&install lifts as long as the floor is solid enough for 9K-12K lifts.
      Location: has to be within a few miles of 92627 Costa Mesa, preferably in the west side, the closer it is to our main location, the better. It MUST have Auto Repair zoning and all other necessary permits. We will add this location to our BAR, OSHA, insurance etc accounts.
      Price : depends on location, size and terms. We have been in the same location for 7 years with excellent reputation with the landlord and customers and neighbors, you are welcome to get reference checks.
      Move in date: we can sign the lease sometime in June, and I don't know when we will actually start using the location, I just want to have it ready soon.
      Occupation Frequency: we will use it from time to time OR keep at least 1 tech there all day (currently undecided), between hours of :  MON-SAT : 8:00-19:00 (we do NOT plan on doing any work outside these hours)
      Size: MUST have at least 2 bays inside, and at least 6 additional parking spots around it. I will be happy to pay extra for a small/medium sized office too. NO waiting area necessary for the time being, BUT a small one with 3 chairs would not hurt.
      Utilities: as long as there is electricity, we can make it work. Air, New & Waste oil tanks etc are nice to have, but NOT a must.
      Please let me know if you have something available with details on location, pictures, availability, price and any special terms.
       
      Thank you very much
       
       
       
       
       
    • By Gonzo
      There’s the bargain hunter, the bargain shopper, the bargain finder, and the “I ain’t shopping anywhere, unless I get a bargain” shoppers.  But, there is one more bargain shopper who tries their best to get something for nothing at the repair shop, and that’s the “Sinch’ ya bargain shopper. 
               The sinch’ ya bargain shopper isn’t hard to find, they’re everywhere.  But, there are a lot of places where this form of shopping never works, such as the grocery store and at the gas pump. Now, the sinch’ ya shopper may try it at a doctor’s office, but I seriously doubt when they’re at the dentist getting a cavity filled they’ll ask, “Sinch’ ya got that tooth fixed, can ya look at this other one too?” and not consider the fact your dealing with a professional who gets paid for that sort of thing.  Basically, what they are trying to accomplish is to get one thing done while sneaking in something else.  You know the type.  At the repair shop it is a habitual occurrence.
               Take the guy who comes in for a brake job, and then asks, “Sinch’ ya got it here, could you see why the check engine light is on.”  Sometimes, the shop will bow to their request, but a lot of times this simple check ends up taking a considerable amount of the technicians time, because the problem in question isn’t a simple problem after all. 
               It could be their thinking process assumes it’s no big deal, since the car is in the service bay already. Although, sometimes it’s pretty obvious it’s an intentional effort to slip in another repair on the cheap. And you can bet, if the mechanic checks things out and finds it’s a major issue, they’re not inclined to pay for any diagnostic time. I mean what was the mechanic thinking?  They just wanted you (the mechanic) to “look” at it, not diagnose it.
               Now, that’s another thing. That word “look”.  It seems to go hand in hand with the “Sinch’ ya” bargain shopper.  “Can ya look at this for me too?  Since it’s here?” however, when the service writer says, “They’ll have to charge you for the time to look at it”, you can bet the next thing they’ll say is, “Oh, never mind then. If it’s going to cost me anything I’ll just wait until next time.”
               That little word “look” tends to lead to other issues as well. Time after time I’ve been asked, “Well, if ya can’t look at it for free, what do ya “think” it is?” Oh here we go again.  Now, the mechanic isn’t looking, he’s gotta think, sinch’ ur there and all. Which is probably the worst idea ever. Guessing at a repair just starts the wheel of parts spinning and hope it lands on something cheap. You can guess at a probable solution, with luck and experience the mechanic might actually have the correct answer. But, I have to wonder, is that all they really wanted in the first place? You know,  a free spin on the parts wheel.
       Obviously the answer can only be based on what information was given.  What if it’s not the right solution?  What if the mechanic’s answer doesn’t match what they’ve researched on the internet? What if they think it’s still something else and the mechanic is wrong? Now what? I’ve solved these “thinking” answers with my own little tidbit of wacky wisdom. I’ll tell them, “I try not to think. It gets me in trouble every time. I’d rather test it and be sure.” Which only leads to, “Then, what would be your best guess?” 
               Now we’ve gone passed the sinch’ ya, the look, and the think, and have gone straight to the guess.  I’ve got a standard answer for the guess.  It’s an answer that throws the whole question of sinch’ ya, look, and think right out the window.  I tell them, “Well, it sounds like butterflies in the muffler.”  Imagine the unusual stares I get. For me, it’s a priceless moment. It’s about then they realize I’m not about to tell them anything worthwhile about my job, their car, or their problem.  Let’s face it, the long and short of it all is thinking, looking, and sinch’ ya’s don’t put supper on the table. 
               Of course, it’s all about the dollar.  It goes back to why it’s not such a good idea to give estimates over the phone without knowing the condition of the vehicle.  Despite their best efforts to explain things, I’ve found over the years if they knew what was wrong in the first place chances are we wouldn’t be having this conversation.
               But, sinch’ ur here, maybe I can make an exception.  Maybe I’ll bend a bit and take a look at the problem.  Yea, I’ve slipped up more than a few times, usually after I’ve forgotten the golden rule of not “looking” at a customer’s car unless we’ve agreed on a fee.  And, what happens 99% of time?  They’ll thank me and tell me they’ll be back later to have the work done, but I wouldn’t hold your breath you’ll ever see them again. 
               In large, urban shops the whole concept of the sinch’ ya bargain hunter is probably a whole lot different than the same type of customer in a small rural town.  Meaning, there isn’t one set rule or answer to the issue.  The big problem for both the big city and the small town is educating the customer, as well as the technician on what it takes to do this job.
               I’ve got to admit, after 3 decades of working on cars I still don’t quite understand the general public. Sinch ya’ gotta have them, you might as well “look” at their car and tell them what ya “think”, at least that’s my best “guess”.  But, I am sure of one thing, when I retire from all this wrenching and scanning I won’t be the bargain hunter type of customer. I know from experience what it takes to do this job, and I highly respect anyone who takes on this trade and performs the job with professionalism.  But, I might ask ya to check the butterflies in the muffler, sinch’ ya got it in the shop and all.

      View full article
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×