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Joe Marconi

Are You The Boss, Or A Leader?

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Are You The Boss, Or A Leader?

 

Legendary Green Bay Packers Football coach Vince Lombardi was more than just a coach, he was a leader. Lombardi made average players great and great players even greater. He understood the principles of leadership and how to motivate people beyond the ordinary. Lombardi knew that if he could get his players to think as a team, and focus as one, he would be successful. He accomplished this strategy, wining 5 national championships and the first two Super Bowls before retiring in 1967.

 

Vince Lombardi preached more than football. He preached discipline, integrity, respect for authority and to always strive to be the best. He was tough on his players, but dedicated his life to them. Lombardi lived by many rules; among my favorites: “Chase perfection. If you settle for nothing less than your best, you will be amazed at what you can accomplish in your life.”

 

We are Shop Owners. We are the bosses of our companies. But we are more than that. We are leaders. And with that comes a responsibility to ourselves and the people we employ. As the leader you need to bring out the best in people. Inspire them to work hard to achieve excellence. Create a philosophy of teamwork where everyone knows the vision of the company and all are unified by the same cause. And above all, understand that as a leader you must always do what is in the best interest of your customers and the people that work with you.

 

Vince Lombardi was also a man of character. This one attribute is crucial for us as business owners. Moral Character dictates our culture. It’s who we are as a person. Our moral character will ultimately determine how effective we are as leaders and consequently how successful we become. By the way, the only true way to attain success is to help others around us become successful.

 

I will end with another favorite quote from Vince Lombardi: “Improvements in moral character are our own responsibility. Bad habits are eliminated not by others, but by ourselves.”

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