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Special Tools Needed For Repair....who pays for tool?


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Hey guys,

 

Wanted to find out how all of you other shop owners handle situations where a repair job will need a special tool but none of the technicians have this tool. Do you as shop owners purchase the tool or do you have your technicians purchase the tool and deduct it from their pay? I understand that larger tools (A/C Machine, Trans Flush Machine, Brake Lathe etc.) are the responsibility of the shop owner to purchase but how do you all handle the smaller special tools required for repair? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!

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I ask my techs if they think they want to own the tool, now I use this only in cases where I know I will buy the tool and inventory it. Like a special tool for holding timing ect. If its a set of sockets that are made to make the work easier, thats on them to buy. Its a gray area between myself investing in my shop and my techs investing in their future and I try to be a nice guy and help them out. I also will pay on their tool accounts for a job well done, they always love that.

 

I get an impression that this is a new topic for you, if so definitly some things to consider:

-seperate place for special tools

-A inventory in your parts system with seperate group so you can run inventory.

-Tag system for signing tools out, I'm lax with this, but when something goes missing or misplaced, all of my guyys are inconvienced enough to not make the same mistake.

-Label tool with an engravor(sp?).

 

If your just asking around, I like to be reasonable with my techs, I don't want them to spend their hard earned money on every tool for the job. My guys have been working for me for a long time so I don't mind buying tools for them that I will own but are available for them to use to maintain a level of feeling like I'm there for them, not working against them.

 

Hope that helps!

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I ask my techs if they think they want to own the tool, now I use this only in cases where I know I will buy the tool and inventory it. Like a special tool for holding timing ect. If its a set of sockets that are made to make the work easier, thats on them to buy. Its a gray area between myself investing in my shop and my techs investing in their future and I try to be a nice guy and help them out. I also will pay on their tool accounts for a job well done, they always love that.

 

I get an impression that this is a new topic for you, if so definitly some things to consider:

-seperate place for special tools

-A inventory in your parts system with seperate group so you can run inventory.

-Tag system for signing tools out, I'm lax with this, but when something goes missing or misplaced, all of my guyys are inconvienced enough to not make the same mistake.

-Label tool with an engravor(sp?).

 

If your just asking around, I like to be reasonable with my techs, I don't want them to spend their hard earned money on every tool for the job. My guys have been working for me for a long time so I don't mind buying tools for them that I will own but are available for them to use to maintain a level of feeling like I'm there for them, not working against them.

 

Hope that helps!

 

 

That's the way we see it. B)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I only have one mechanic so it may be different, but I own the special tools and don't expect him to buy them. I have the Digital Multimeters, the Scantools, the ball joint presses, the special sockets, the torches, welders, air hammers, diagnostic equipment. I only expect my mechanic to have basic hand tools needed to complete most jobs, ie: sockets, wrenches, ratchets, breaker bars, screw drivers etc...

 

If a specialty item is needed it comes out of the shop account and I try my best to decide whether we can take on this job or not (depending on whether or not we expect to do more of these repairs).

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