Quantcast
Jump to content


Joe Marconi

Check Vital Signs and Drive More Sales

Recommended Posts

Check Vital Signs and Drive More Sales

Think total car care, each time every time

 

Every shop owner knows the value of performing a multipoint inspection. But, is it done properly and on a consistent basis? From my work with many shop owners, I found that although most shops have a process in place, the multipoint inspection is not being consistently.

 

Technicians are wired to focus on the problem at hand. If a customer brings their car in with a Check Engine light issue, most techs will chase down the problem and repair it without a problem. But, what about the rest of the car? Is the car due for any other needed services? Are there any other issues the customer needs to be aware of?

I have challenged many shop owners with the above scenario and have asked, “So, you repaired the check engine light, but were the brakes inspected, fluids checked, tire pressure checked along with other vital systems”?

 

Look at it this way, when you go to your doctor for any issue, a competent doctor is going to check your blood pressure, heart rate, listen to your chest, look inside your mouth and look in your ears. The doctor looks at your vital signs. To focus only on what the customer brings the car in for is not total car care; it is not doing the right thing for the customer and does nothing for your business.

 

Obviously, we always need to address the customer’s initial concern first. But each customer should be informed that we also perform a bumper to bumper multipoint inspection and check for any needed maintenance services, which may be due by the current vehicle mileage and other potential problems.

 

Many shop owners are fearfully of being perceived as being too “pushy” with this approach. I disagree. Let me tell you what happened recently to a friend of mine. My friend’s son brought his car to a shop for a stalling problem. The diagnosis was a faulty mass air sensor, which solved the problem. No multipoint inspection was performed, and the shop tech never checked the oil. On the way home, the oil light came on and the engine began to knock. My friend’s son turned around and brought the car back to the shop.

 

Back at the shop, the tech checked the oil level, only to find that there was no oil in the engine. He raised the car in the air and found a leaking oil pressure switch. But, it was too late; there was internal damage to the engine.

 

Now, is the shop “technically” responsible? No. But, would have a multipoint inspection spotted the problem? You bet it would have! My friend did not press the issue or hold the shop responsible, but he will never return to that shop either.

 

Protect your customer, protect yourself, drive more sales and do the right thing for the customer: Perform those multipoint inspections each time, every time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • Increase auto repair sales by adding to the cart

      Retail stores have known for a long time that adding or increasing the size of shopping carts also increases sales. Consumers may go to the store with a list, but as they pass through the aisles, having a cart makes it easy to add to that list.  While your repair shop does not use shopping cart, the same strategy can used. Every customer that books an appointment as done so with some sort of list; an oil change service, a brake issue, tire rotation, etc.  Through an effective multipoint inspection and looking at service schedules, you can make suggestions to your customers that can add to their cart; essentially increasing sales per vehicle. One last thing: Always make service and repair suggestions to the customer that is in their best interest and have value, and you can’t go wrong.  It’s actually great customer service. 

      By Joe Marconi, in Joe’s Business Tips For Shop Owners

        
      • 0 replies
      • 170 views
    • Do you guarantee results from your diagnostic time?

      I think we all know that diagnostics is the most costly service we provide in the automotive repair business today. In today's automotive repair environment, you need to be selling diagnostics, and getting paid for it. I'm looking for feedback on when things don't go exactly as planned.  Let's say a car comes in and you sell some diagnostics, by the hour, or from a menu. After you complete that work, and you still don't have an answer, do you go back to the customer and sell some more? Do you continue at your expense? If you do go back to the customer, and you have nothing conclusive after that, then what? Do you keep going back and selling more diagnostic work until you solve the problem? If you continue to go back and sell more, how many times can you do that? We've all had that car that we've worked on for weeks to find some strange problem. I doubt many customers are willing to pay for the 40 hours you spent on the car. Now lets say after 5 hours of work that the customer agreed to, you are no closer to finding the issue than when the car came in. Do you charge them for the 5 hours and send them down the road even though you have not provided them with a diagnoses? Do you start spending your time trying to solve the issue because you have a hard time charging for 5 hours and are unable to provide any answers? I'm asking these questions as I am rethinking my business strategy on diagnostics a little. Our shop is known for its abilities to diagnose problems. We have other shops bringing cars to us on a regular basis because of these abilities. I actually get several calls and emails weekly from across the county for help diagnosing problems. There are times, a lot of times, when I think this is more of a curse, than a blessing. I know we are in the business of fixing cars, and we need to be able to find problems if customers are going to keep coming back. But after my lead tech and I spent a considerable amount of time over the last 15 days diagnosing the strangest intermittent no start issue on an Audi, and watching his frustration grow everyday, not because of the difficulty of the issue as we both love the challenge, but because it held him back from addressing the other work that was coming in the shop.  So, as rewarding as it was to solve that mystery, I can't help but look back at what it cost me financially, and the frustration to the technician, and realize we have to come up with a way to try to avoid going down those rabbit holes. Right now my idea is to give it 1 hour. If after an hour, we are not relatively certain that we will find the issue, with another hour or two, then let the car go. Let the customer know that it's not that we can't fix the car, but that we cannot fix it efficiently. If I lose that customer, it would probably still be cheaper that working on his car for 2 weeks. Love to hear your thoughts. Scott          

      By ScottSpec, in Auto Repair Shop Management Help? Post Here!

      • 8 replies
      • 380 views
    • Enhanced your vehicle multipoint inspections with Video

      Has any signed up or know of this product? "Truvideo" BG has partnered with a company called Truvideo.  The process allows you to take a short video of the car and document any issues. The video is then sent to the customer, either thru a text message or email. The tech or service advisor narrates the video.  The customer can see on video things like worn brakes, worn tires, a leaking hose, etc.   I think that this has its place in the multipoint process. Below is a link for more information. Your thoughts? https://www.bgprod.com/programs/truvideo/  

      By Joe Marconi, in The Customer Experience

        
      • 7 replies
      • 652 views
    • Shop Owners: You don’t have to answer every question for your employees

      As shop owners, we sometimes feel that we need to answer every question and handle every situation. While you need to be proficient as a business owner, you also need your employees to think for themselves.  Empower your people to solve problem.  Ask them for their opinions and don’t be too quick to jump in on every situation.  The more you jump in and solve their problems, the more they will rely on you. This is not to say you don’t have their back; but a team functions best when everyone takes ownership of their position and takes responsibility to take care of problems. Will employees make mistakes? Yes.  But there isn’t a shop owner on this planet that has a perfect record at making decisions.  We all make mistakes. As a shop owner; teach, mentor and coach.  Include your employees in on decisions that relate to their job position.  When employees feel you trust them, they will begin to solve their own problems. This will set you free to work on the things that will bring you greater success.

      By Joe Marconi, in Joe’s Business Tips For Shop Owners

        
      • 2 replies
      • 304 views
    • Auto shop owner new forum topics

      Just got my e-mail on the latest forum topics. Out of 20 topics 7 are marketing ads from the same person. Also under popular forum topics of 5, 3 are ads also by same person of which no discussion took place. So how are these popular. I get a ton of advertising e-mail. Just didn't expect this from ASO. I do look into some ASO sponsor ads. But this is not necessary.

      By slowtech, in Member Feedback

      • 14 replies
      • 539 views
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×