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Joe Marconi

Be Honest with Us, Warren Buffet

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Something smells a little fishy with Warren Buffett's tax rule. He wants us to really believe that the tax code should be changed and that the majority of the taxes will be paid by the rich? Any increase in taxes will be put on the backs of the working class, you can bet on that. Plus, Mr Buffet, how about paying your own back taxes? You owe 1 billion dollars. You want to help this country, start by paying your own taxes!

 

From NewsMax:

 

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett triggered a major debate over taxes recently when he wrote in The New York Times that he should be paying more to the federal government. He called on Washington lawmakers to up tax rates on the rich.

 

But it turns out that Buffett’s own company, Berkshire Hathaway, has had every opportunity to pay more taxes over the last decade. Instead, it’s been mired in a protracted legal battle with the Internal Revenue Service over a bill that one analyst estimates may total $1 billion.

 

Yes, that’s right: while Warren Buffett complains that the rich aren’t paying their fair share his own company has been fighting tooth and nail to avoid paying a larger share.

 

The story of Berkshire’s years-long tax battle, which is generally known in business circles, took on new life this week when a group called Americans for Limited Government (ALG) reported that, according to Berkshire Hathaway’s own annual report, the company is embroiled in an ongoing standoff over its tax bills.

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