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We are looking to purchase a new alignment center. We now have a John Bean Visualiner 3-D. It has served us well and is working fine. I think it is time to get one that does it faster to be more efficent. Thank you for all your suggestions that I know you will tell me. Please also tell me how long it takes to do a standard alignment.

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      Sarge, I miss having you around the shop.

      Semper fi my old friend... Semper fi

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