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Myers Tire Supply is pushing a new TPMS solution. I played around with it at SEMA this year and it seems like an excellent and affordable system. Here is the link: http://www.alligator-sensit.com/

 

Rather than having to purchase a new OEM sensor, they sell an aftermarket replacement that can clone the defective sensor. You program the new sensor using a simple little USB pad that works with any computer. They claim to have about 85% model coverage growing to 90% by the end of the year. They are saying software updates will be free. I guess they are planning to make their money on the sale of the aftermarket sensors and accessories (valve stems, cores, o-rings, etc). It looks like a great system with the total start-up cost around $750. The sensors are supposed to sell for around $25-35 i believe. Anyone have any experience with it yet? If all true, it seems to be an excellent solution with good profit potential.

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