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Gonzo

WHAT'S IN A NAME?

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ACURA

Always Catching Up, Rarely Ahead

Asia's Curse Upon Rural America

A Car Usually Rarely Appreciates

 

AMC

Always Made Crap

Autos May Combust

 

AUDI

Accelerates Under Demonic Influence

Always Unsafe Designs Implemented

Always Under Diagnostic Inspection

Always Upside-down, Double Interest

Another Understated Dealer Incentive

A Used Dodge Incognito

 

 

BMW

Bob Marley and the Wailers

Beautiful Mechanical Wonder

Beautiful Models Wanted

Bavarian Manure Wagon

Biggest Metal Waste

Big Money Works

Bring My Wallet

Burn My Wallet

Bought My Wife

Brutal Money Waster

Break My Window

Bring More Women

Bring More Wrenches

Bavarian Money Waster

Bring My Wad!

Blew My Wad!

Big Money Wasted

Bring Money Where?

Buy More Women

But Mom, Why?

Big Manufactured Waste

 

BUICK

Big Ugly Indestructible Car Killer

Big Ugly Idiot's Cat Killer

 

CADILLAC

Company Always Denies Its Lawful Liability After Collisions

Company Asking Dealers If Local Lawyers Are Calling

 

CAMARO

Cash Always Miniscule After Retail Overpricing

 

 

CHEVROLET

Can Hear Every Valve Rap On Long Extended Trips

Cheap, Hardly Efficient, Virtually Runs On Luck Every Time

Cheap Heap Every Valve Rattles, Oil Leaks Every Time

Cant Have Every Vehicle Race On Last Every Time

Can hear every valve rattle, oil leaks every time

Check Heads Every Valve Rattles Or Leaks Every Time

Cracked Heads Every Valve Rattles Oil Leaks Every Time

Cheap Heap Every Valve Rattling Oil Leaking Everywhere Truck

 

CHEVY

Can Hear Every Valve, Rod, or Lifter Every Time

Can't Have Everything Vern, YaknowwhatImean?

Cheapest Heap Ever Visualized Yet

Crap Hasn't EVolved Yet

 

CHRYSLER

Everyone knows who Lee Iacocca is right? His name IACOCCA stands for:

I Am Chairman Of Chrysler Corporation America

Company Has Recommended You Start Learning Engine Repair Company Has Rid Your Savings Legally: Electronic Robbery

Chrysler Has Raped Your Sanity Loser - Expect Repercussions

PT Loser (for PT Cruiser name)

PT Boozer

 

DAEWOO

Damn All Engines With Oriental Operations

Damn Asian Engineering Works Only Occasionally

 

DODGE

Doing Overhauls Daily Gets Expensive

Doesn't only die, gets eaten

Darn Old Dirty Gas Eater

Design Of Diabolical German Engineer

Drips Oil, Drops Grease Everywhere

Damned Old Dudes Going Everywhere

Damn Overhauls Do Get Expensive

Dear Old Dad's Garbage Engine

Dodge Neon: Need Engine Overhauled Now

Darned Old Dirty Greasy Engine

Don't Our Dealers Gouge Everyone

 

FERRARI

Ferociously Elegant Racer Ravages All Roads Intuitively

 

FIAT

Found In A Trashcan

Fantastic In A Tightspot

Finest Italian Automotive Technology

Futile Italian Attempt at Transportation

Failure In Italian Automotive Technology

Fix It All the Time

Fix it again, Tony!

Fix It Another Time

 

FIRESTONE

Firestone Inexplicably Recalls Explosive SUV Tires On Non-stable Explorers

Firestone Overstates Reliability Data

 

FORD

Aspire: A Swift Punt In Rear End

PINTO: Please, It's Not Too Odious!

PINTO: Pyrotechnics Inevitable; No Timer Onboard

PINTO: Put In New Transmission Often

Ford Pinto: Flaming Oven Roasted Driver-Passengers Incinerated Nine Times Over

THUNDERBIRD: This Hoopty Usually Needs Daily Engine Repair But It Rolls Downhill

MUSTANG - Motor Usually Starts Then Almost Never Goes

Found on repairman's doorstep

Found on rack daily

Ford Owners Recommend Dodge

Full Of Rust Deposits

Faithful, Obedient, Reliable, Dependable

F**KING OLD RETARDED DRIVER

Ford Focus....Ford F**ck Us

F**ker Only Rolls Downhill

Fancy Oil Recycling Device

Found On Rubbish Dump

F***ed Over Road Disaster!

F***ing Oakey's Really Dig'em

F**king Obese Road Disasters

F**king Old Retarded Dudes

Frequent Overhaul, Rapid Depreciation

F***ing Old Rebuilt Dodge

For Old Retired Drunks

Here's another good one: FORD backwards --> Driver Relies On Family

First On Recall Day

Fast On Race Day

For Off Road Driving

Fireball On Rear Damage

First On Race Day

First On Rust and Deterioration

Fix Or Repair Daily

Found On Road, Dead

Frequently Overhauled, Rarely Driven

Fault Of R & D

MUSTANG - Mostly Unwanted Scrap Tin And Needless Garbage

F***ed On Raw Deal

Fast Only Rolling Downhill

Most tasteless one on the page: Found O.J. and Ron's DNA

Flip Over, Read Directions

Fork Over Remaining Dough

F**king Owners Really Dumb

F***ed On Race Day

(F)illped (O)ver ®esevation (D)ecoration

(F)**ked (O)ver ®ebuilt (D)iahatsu

For Old Retired Dutchmen

Found On Road Draggin

Frickin Old Ragged Dumpster

Fu**ed Over Rebuilt Dodge

First On Repair Day

FORD Owners Really Dumb

From Our Reject Department

LTD = Load of Trash from Detroit

FORD backwards = Driver Returns on Foot

 

 

 

GEO

Get Everything Overpriced

Got Everything Overhauled

 

GM

Government Motors

General Maintenance

General Mistakes

Generally Malfunctions

General Misery

Great Mess

General Malpractice

Genital Motors

Give More

GiMme

Getting Malignant

Got Me

Grab Me

 

GMC

God's Mechanical Curse

Getting Mostly Crap

GM Made Crap

Generally Makes Clouds

Garage Man's Companion

Generic Motors Corporation

Got A Mechanic Coming?

Greatest Mistake Created

Great Mountain of Crap

Greasy Messy Contraption

Gay Man's Chevy

Generically Made Chevrolet

Gimme My Checkbook!

Get More Cash!

 

HONDA

Had One, Never Did Again

Horribly Overpriced, Needing Dad's Assistance

Hang On, Not Done Accelerating

Honest, Officer, Nobody Drank Anything

Happy Owners Never Drive Anything else

Honda Options: No Deal Available!

Hold On, No Dealer Add-ons!

Honda Options Never Deal Affordably

Hang On, No Dealer Acquisitions!

 

HUMMER

Hope U Made Me Extra Reliable

Huge Ugly Mother, Mostly Eats Resources

 

HYUNDAI

Here's Y U Never Drive An Import

Hope You Understand: Nothing's Drivable And Inexpensive

Hardly Your Understanding New Dealer Allowance Incentive

Hold Your Usual Nitpicks, Designs Are Improved

Helps You Undergo New Debt After Inception

Hang Your UNDerwear Anywhere Inside

Hope You Understand, No Deals Available Inside

 

Jeep

Just Empty Every Pocket

Just Expect Every Problem (Sent in by a visitor)

Just Eats Every Penny

Just Everybody Else's Parts

Junk Everyone Eventually Piles

Just Expect Extra Payments

 

 

Jaguar

Just A Guess U Are Rich

Jumps Around Grinds Uncontrollably Always Rusting

Jump Around Get Up And Run

 

Kia

Keep It Away!

Kick It's Ass

Korean Imitation Accord

Korea's Imported Accident

Killer's Imported Asset

Kiss It Away

Killed In Action

Keep Inside Asia

Korea Invades America

Korean Industrial Accident

Killer Implosion Awaits

Killed In Accident

 

LAMBORGHINI

Loser Always Maintains Big Old Rotten Gunk; Hardly Inflates Nobody's Image

Lucky A Man By Owning Really Gives His Image Nice Inflation

 

LOTUS

Loads Of Trouble Usually Serious

 

Maserati

Must Also Suggest Extra Rope And Towing Implements

 

MAZDA

Most Always Zipping Dangerously Along

Must Always Zoom Down Asphalt

Most Are Zealously Duped Always

 

MERCEDES

My Expensive Race Car Emits Dense Exhaust Smoke - But Efficiency Near Zero

Most Expensive Road Car Everyone Drives Except Steve

Merger Engaged Reverse Chrysler Entering Decline Evident Soon

 

MITSUBISHI

Manufactured In Taiwan Sold Under British Influence Shipped Here Incomplete

Management Incessantly Tolerates Socially Unacceptable Behavior, Ignoring Sexual Harassment Incidents

May Involve Turbos, Suck Unless Boost Is Seriously High Inside Men In Tight Spots Uttering Bulls__t In Sexual Harassment Investigation

 

MOPAR

Match Old Parts As Required

Most Often Parked At Roadside

Move Over, Power Approaching Rapidly

My Old Pig Ain't Runnin'

Move Over People Are Racing

Mostly Old Parts And Rust

Motor On Pavement After Race

Moments Of Power Are Rare

 

NISSAN

Nobody Intelligent Sorrowfully Saying Ahhh Nutz

Need I Say Something About Nothing

Never In Season Simply A No-show</FONT>

 

OLDSMOBILE

Old Ladies Driving Slowly Make Others Behind Infuriatingly Late Everyday

Overpriced, Leisurely Driven Sedan Made Of Buick's Irregular Leftover Equipment

Oldmobile</FONT>

 

PONTIAC

Poor Old Ninny Thinks It's A Cadillac

Piece Of Nasty Tacky Icky Ass Crap

Plan On Numerous Trips In Another Car

FIREBIRD: Fast Irresistible Real Electrifying Bird Inexpensive Racing Dare-Devil

Pretty Overpriced Not That I Am Concerned

 

PORSCHE

Plenty Of Receipts. Sorry, Can't Have Everything

PLENTY OF REPAIRS SERVICE CAN'T HELP EVERYTHING

Proof Only Rich Snobby Children Have Everything

 

SAAB

Some Ass Actually Boughtit!

Styling Absent After Buyout

Backwards >>>> Bad Asses Always Suffocate

Sorry Auto Assembled Backwards

Sad Attempt At Beauty

Send Another Automobile Back

Swedish Automobiles Always Breakdown

Sorry Assed American Buyers

Start Adding Additional Brakefluid

Stop Asking About Brakes!

Sorry As A Bum

 

SALEEN

Some Aristocrats Love Every Expensive Novelty

 

SATURN

Sorry Assed Transmission Under Repair Now

Some Argue That Ubiquitous Repairs Needed

Send Another Towtruck Ubiquitous Repairs Needed

Same American Trash Under Revised Name

 

SUBARU

Stupid Urbanites Bumbling Around Rural Areas

SUBARU backwards is: U R A BUS (You are a bus)

Subaru: Souped Up Bad Ass Racing Unit

Souped Up Blazingly Awesome Racing Unit

 

TOYOTA

Too Often Yankees Overprice This Auto

Totalled Only Yesterday, Officer Towed Away

This One You Oughta Tow Away

To Operate Your Own Terrific Automobile

Tolerances Over Yielding, Often Towed Away

Toyota Overcharges You On Their Accessories

 

VOLVO

Very Odd Looking Vehicular Object

Very Overpriced Lame Vehicle Options

 

VW

Virtually Worthless

Very Wonderful

Very Weird

Very Old Lowered Kinky Sedan With A Great Engine Noise

Volks Who?

 

 

Edited by Gonzo

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      • 344 views
    • [Podcast] Selling Diagnostic Time

      How To Sell Diagnostics at a Profit? This is not an easy question to answer. Service professionals must be paid for their expertise because the cost of doing diagnostics is the most expensive service you have in your building.  LISTEN HERE. It is time to move from diagnostics to testing and analyzing. Every shop needs to build a premium product around testing and analyzing. You need to be known as the ‘we can fix anything right the first time shop’. Your motto: “We have the best technicians.” Your shops testing and analyzing skills is the premium product you sell and are known for in your marketplace. No need to go anywhere else. We do the research, test, analyze and discover what is wrong. We present the solution then you decide. Marketing this premium product requires a strong testing/analyzing process that both the service advisor and technician are totally in agreement with. The benefits allow the SA to confidently sell testing and analyzing. The diagnostician knows that the SA will sell the value and benefits to the customer because the process dictates the work to be done. A very strong discussion and powerful take-a-ways that will arrest the black hole in your business of profitable diagnostic time.   

      By carmcapriotto, in Shop Management Coaching, Business Training, Consulting

        
      • 0 replies
      • 232 views
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