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Hey guys I know we have gone over this before but I'm still having a hard time.I have been open for 3 months now I;m in the middle of a small communty on the edge of a small city/town.I am a Napa Care Center,I use Tracs.I am a mechanic/tech by trade so this is new to me.I went to one of Chubby's seminars and agree I was not marking up enough and need to start thinking like a shop owner.I was bouncing around the 40% gross profit,I now try 50% for smaller parts.Chubbys matix seems too high for me only because all my costumers are first timers.Chubbys methods seems its more for established garages.I also think that Napa's prices on some things to me are high,And things like fluid ATF oil can,t be marked up 69% if your needing say 7 qt Dex Merc would be $18 a qt to the costomer if I bought from Napa....really? I need a matrix I can trust I,m adjusting prices on the fly I can't teach anybody how to do tickets like this.Please does anybody have a happy medeuim?

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