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Joe Marconi

Checking in From Las Vegas

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So far the event has been ok for the mechanical side, very good for the collision. The Collision vendors are here in full force and there is a lot to see. The seminars are great, from the ones that I took both business and technical. The attendance has been pretty good too. The OE also is also here, and it more dedicated to what they can offer to the collision side.

 

Some of the more well know vendors here are:

 

Elite worldwide

Auto Shop Solutions

Mitchell 1

Repair Pal

Customer Link

Jasper Engines and Transmission

Identifix

Motor Age

Body shop Business

Ford

Chev

Chrysler

Hunter

...there are a lot more, just can't remember right now

 

Today is the last day, flying home in the morning.

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