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Just wondering how much of everyone's work comes from other local businesses. Do you actively recruit their business or do you just wait untill they come to you for service? What type of discount do you offer them if any . We do not work on vehicles for the general public - i save all those for gonzo - ha ha. It does keep the "price shoppers" and crazies to a very minimum level- and in todays economy there are alot of those types. We do not do semis or large box trucks - cars and trucks up to 3500 series only- i am located in a fairly large city with more than enough large companies that have a fleet of vehicles - the business model of ONLY doing work for other businesses is a great selling point - it gives the companies the impression of a more personalized relationship with their repair vendor.you would be surprised how receptive they are to not having to share a shop with the general public. And did i mention the stress level is almost non-existent... no price haggling, minor damage complaints,parts price whining - they just want to know when will it be done and how much... so... what is your fleet customer base like? and what discounts if any do you give them?

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