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Gonzo

Me? A Flasher?

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Me? A Flasher?

 

Ok, ya got me… I’m a Flasher… or more to the point a Re-flasher. With today’s cars and components it’s not uncommon to have to flash some drivability controller or theft system. As an independent shop most of the re-flashing you can do will be for drivability situations or theft systems. Right now, the federal laws (Clean Air Act) only requires the manufacturer to give access to the “emission” related systems which means, an after-market scanner may only be able to provide you with part of a download vs. the entire download. Those “extras” are left to the manufacturer/dealership shops. Some of those extras could be HVAC, 4WD, wiper systems, just about any system deemed not necessary for drivability, however if a system is part of the PCM and it will effect drivability (ABS on most GM’s for instance) then it is shown as part of the downloadable software. However, if you can get a dealer level scanner and dealer level software… then it’s no problem. But, for the most part I’m not going to get into the reprogramming with a tech 2, WDS, or any other dealer level scanner, I’ll stick with the re-flashing that is available for the independent market that we will all have in our tool inventory sooner or later.

 

J2534

 

The reason for re-flashing can be many, sometimes it’s an update to the transmission for better shift quality or to installing a new PCM. Each manufacturer has their own specific way of handling the procedure to obtain/process/and download the needed software. There are a lot of useable aftermarket scanners that can aide in the process and some are better than others. The one thing they all have in common is “J2534” which is the needed software/cable setup to perform re-flashing by an independent.

 

One of the first things you’ll need to start the re-flashing is a subscription to that particular manufacturer’s website. Costs vary and the length of subscriptions will also vary. Here is a list of the websites that I use:

 

GM – www.gmtechinfo.com

 

Ford – www.motorcraft.com

 

Chrysler – www.techauthority.com

 

Honda – www.serviceexpress.honda.com

 

Toyota – www.techinfo.toyota.com

 

Nissan – www.nissan-techinfo.com

 

These are the most common ones that I will use from time to time, if you don’t have these websites saved somewhere, you should…. Write these down and keep them handy.

 

After you purchase the needed subscription there will be some information that you will need to obtain either from the car or from the website to start the process. Follow the information given on that particular manufacturer’s website.

 

Toyota requires you to not only gain access to their website but also you will have to obtain a CD from them before you can do any re-flashing. So if you are planning on doing any re-flashing on a Toyota you’ll need to have the CD ahead of time.

 

I can’t stress enough that you need to follow every word and follow every command while doing the re-flash… be careful… take your time. If you run into a questionable area check the home page of the website for any 800 numbers you can call and talk directly to someone. I’ve had to do that on many occasions… and there is no doubt that talking with someone can speed up the process when you’re stuck. On most of the import cars I’ve found that you will need to obtain the original controller ID from the module you are re-flashing before starting the re-flash. This can be obtained thru mode 9 of your scanner. These calibration numbers will indicate whether or not there is a re-flash even available or which is the latest calibration for that model. On some of the individual screens you may have followed all the information correctly and there is no “next” soft key to click on… the only soft key says “exit” don’t worry it’s not going to take you out of the program… it will only advance you to the next screen.

 

Generally, the re-flash can take up to 30 minutes in some cases so give yourself plenty of time to complete the process without any major interruptions. Be sure to have the vehicles battery fully charged and or on a suitable charging unit for the duration of the re-flash.

 

As of this day and age, I can’t say that re-flashing is all that profitable…. Yet…it’s necessary but it just doesn’t come around often enough to make the big investment for all the different makes and models out there. Personally, I think the PCM units are far superior to the first years of the computer age cars. But, I’m very confident that it will be profitable in the near future. As the computer driven car becomes older more and more re-flashing information will be released to the independent side of the industry. (Wish we had complete access now)

 

There’s one common factor when it comes to software, obtainable scanners, and electronic information, it not only changes rapidly, it probably has already changed by the time this article is in print. So don’t be surprised if the information and data has changed by the time you take your first attempt at reprogramming… take it slow, read carefully, and follow all the directions.

 

Remember it only seems difficult when you first try it… then it starts getting easier each and every time after that. Go for it… ! !

 

 

 

 

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