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Need advice on how to handle this situation and I am open to any idea before I tell the guy to take a hike.

customer bought a 94 honda accord 3 months ago which is a wrecked rebuild P.O.S. Brought it to me last week to check out a/c not cooling. For starter the temp control cable was binding and the pressures were all over the place. We replaced the heater valve (which was internally melted) and cable. Then the expansion valve and rec/dryer. The air was cool but not cold. While trying to further diagnose the a/c the car shuts off. Bad electrical on ignition switch and PGM relay was showing signs of failure (no fuel pump power when hot). We sold him on the parts even though he thought "well it ran when I brought it here".

After we installed parts car ran ok, a/c still no good. Advised him to have the radiator moved closer to condenser (previous wreck damage). when he came to get the car the SRS light was on (I cant remember if it was or not). Now thats apparently my fault. I assured him if we broke it we fix it. Tried to flash out SRS codes but nothing but a steady light. SRS unit is probably shot. Took a look at it and it isn't even bolted down, came from JUNK Yard as did the air bags. Aftermarket alarm is wired to some of the SRS wires. So much wrong. not our fault. SRS light on. A/C sucks, mangled up parts and aftermarket wiring. I don't care if he is mad I just want him and the car gone but I don't feel a refund is in order.

Any Advice?

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