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Independents Offer Quality Repairs


Gonzo

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I take anything anyone from AutoMD says with a grain of salt. Of course they don't think OEM is better, they sell aftermarket parts themselves. There are many cases where an OEM part is not only better but essential in a quality repair. Case in point: Go to the AutoMD website and get an "Estimate" for a fuel pump replacement on a 2000 GMC Jimmy. They say parts should cost $90.75 from them or $107.09 at a shop. Labor, if they do it themselves is 3.2 hours or 2 hours at a shop. I just did this repair at my shop. An AC/Delco replacement module was over $320 my cost and the flat rate was 3.0 hours not including draining and refilling the tank (alldata). It actually took about 4 hours with all of the rust issues we have here and the total bill to the customer was just over $600. He was ecstatic, he had called around to several other shops in the area and I was several hundreds less than them and I used the OEM pump. I've compared several of my jobs to automd and found them to be close on some and way off on others.

We have to be careful with regards to telling people OEM is not necessary. There are times when it is the only way to go, this was just one case where OEM is necessary on this vehicle. Sure the pump cost a little more but I won't have to do it all over again in a year. This is where communication and trust between a service writer and customer is key. You have to build that trust first. In my case above, a previous customer of mine recommended me to this person. They spoke highly of me as a trustworthy technician and that I wouldn't steer them wrong. After talking to the customer and explaining why I only will use an OEM pump on these vehicles they understood where I was coming from and allowed me to do the job. It is a tight rope to walk between telling people independent shops are great and you don't need the dealer but on the other hand you do need to use OEM/Dealer parts for some repairs.

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I take anything anyone from AutoMD says with a grain of salt. Of course they don't think OEM is better, they sell aftermarket parts themselves. There are many cases where an OEM part is not only better but essential in a quality repair. Case in point: Go to the AutoMD website and get an "Estimate" for a fuel pump replacement on a 2000 GMC Jimmy. They say parts should cost $90.75 from them or $107.09 at a shop. Labor, if they do it themselves is 3.2 hours or 2 hours at a shop. I just did this repair at my shop. An AC/Delco replacement module was over $320 my cost and the flat rate was 3.0 hours not including draining and refilling the tank (alldata). It actually took about 4 hours with all of the rust issues we have here and the total bill to the customer was just over $600. He was ecstatic, he had called around to several other shops in the area and I was several hundreds less than them and I used the OEM pump. I've compared several of my jobs to automd and found them to be close on some and way off on others.

We have to be careful with regards to telling people OEM is not necessary. There are times when it is the only way to go, this was just one case where OEM is necessary on this vehicle. Sure the pump cost a little more but I won't have to do it all over again in a year. This is where communication and trust between a service writer and customer is key. You have to build that trust first. In my case above, a previous customer of mine recommended me to this person. They spoke highly of me as a trustworthy technician and that I wouldn't steer them wrong. After talking to the customer and explaining why I only will use an OEM pump on these vehicles they understood where I was coming from and allowed me to do the job. It is a tight rope to walk between telling people independent shops are great and you don't need the dealer but on the other hand you do need to use OEM/Dealer parts for some repairs.

 

I couldn't agree more... I prefer OEM to anything... unless there is something special with the aftermarket part that makes it better... seldom does that happen.

 

I thought it was really interesting how the author of the story picked a dimmly lit shop and the grease covered cardboard on the floor... and two guys sticking their heads under a car... not on a lift... and I didn't see any safety jack... does a lot for the image...

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Great, Great story. I wish all our customers would realize this. Actually I wish the dealers would stop spreading these myths. Too many people think they must return to the dealer under the warranty period. At the State Hearing yesterday for the Right to Repair Act, many of the Assmblymen and Senators did no know this was the law! And they write the laws!!!

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  • 1 year later...

Getting a quality repairs for our vehicles is the only thing we look for when we have some damages and other factors. I would like to share that I always search for auto repair shops on internet to get some basic ideas and cost for repairing the damage car.

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