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Joe Marconi

Check engine light dilemma

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Have you ever solved a check engine problem only to have the customer return a few days later with the light on again, but this time for a different code? We have all been down this road.

 

To avoid customers issues we explain how the on board computer works and tell them that because the check engine was on, other tests have been blocked by the car’s computer. This means that if there is another problem, the computer will only check it after this problem is solved. As a result, the check engine light may return if there is another problem.

 

No matter how hard you try to explain this to a customer (and we also state this on the invoice) the customer has a tough time understanding it. All they see is the “same” check engine light and naturally assume it’s the same problem.

 

How are you handling this issue?

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