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Do You Have an Onboarding Process? Or is it Trial by Fire?


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Do you have a formal onboarding, or employee orientation, process?  I know that so many shops these days are looking for employees, and many shops have been short-handed for some time now.  But, is it wise to throw people into the mix without a formal onboarding process?  Many say that the time it takes to prepare a new hire will pay dividends down the road. 

Your thoughts and comments...

Pocus - Onboarding: A Crucial Piece of the PLG Puzzle

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      Typically, when productivity suffers, the shop owner or manager directs their attention to the technicians. Are they doing all they can do to maintain high billable hours? Are they as efficient as they can be?  Is there time being wasted throughout the technician’s day? 
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      Maintaining adequate production levels is the responsibility of management to create the processes that will lead to high production while holding everyone accountable. 
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