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Joe Marconi

Use Checklists as a training tool

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It takes a while for any new employee to get up to speed in thier new position, no matter how seasoned they are.  We have found that using checklists for basic procedures are a great way to acclimate new employees.  

What strategies to you use to get new employees up to seed? 

 

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