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CAR_AutoReports

Article: The 7 Basic Steps Of The Auto Repair Process

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Whether or not we realize it, each shop has a similar workflow process. Like many areas of life, we think that we are all unique in our business strategy. However, reality is we are all very similar, our differences lie in management styles. Our attitude and approach, from employees and customers, defines how we achieve success. 

  1. Check In
  2. Inspection
  3. Estimate Building
  4. Customer Authorization
  5. Work In Progress
  6. Completion
  7. Follow Up

The process, is often hijacked by two elements. The first element is service center employee(s) and their attitude(s) and the second element is the software your business uses.

Your employees are your team, and that’s exactly the best way to approach your business. When you look at employees as team members and not as just “the new guy/girl” or “Jack the mechanic who never combs his hair”... everyone’s attitude begins to change.

gears-r.thumb.jpg.5f1694b78bb67d6890ab700f6b460738.jpg

Being a part of a team is a mindset that everyone ‘shares in the responsibility’, everyone is accountable for their role and if one person fails… everyone has failed. This mindset is used to build all types of companies, some of which end up being valued into the billions of dollars. Teams help each other pick up the slack and work with one another to get through personal and professional barriers.  

The most important thing to remember about the team, is that everyone can have a bad day, week, month or even months. We are all human and too often we forget everyone is going through something. The team element opens the door to communication among the facility and if people are comfortable enough to communicate, they are open to moving past whatever ails them. We are all too quick to give up on someone we have invested an immense amount of time and energy training to our standards.  With the right team, dedication is matched on all ends, resulting in happy customers that not only return... they refer.  Which lowers acquisition costs and keeps business growth healthy.

You can read more about team building here and we also encourage you to search for ideas on team building and how to achieve the optimal team at your auto repair facility.

This article originally published in CAR's News Section


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