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Marketing for Spring?


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Start LLC for $0 at IncFile

Spring is in the air and people are usually in better buying moods. What spring promotions have you done that were successful in the past and what are your marketing plans for this spring season?

 

I think that you need to gear your consumers up for AC checkups and "After-Winter" Checkups.

 

Maybe tie in some sort of AC Free check. Cabin filter replacement with vent cleaning.

 

Maybe a "Get Ready for Warm Weather" Vehicle Check up.

 

What always works is a spring oil change special...lost leader type of service. :P

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  • 1 month later...

My 2 cents worth of marketing for today:

 

Market today for A/C work. Don't wait for customers to tell you their A/C is not working. Br proactive and ask customers if they want the A/C checked. Perform a simple visual inspection on every car and turn the A/C on every car before it enters the bay. Be proactive, be profitable!

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