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Jay Huh

Guess what I saw in this months Ratchet &Wrench?

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"The Net Result" "You have to check your numbers everyday. If you're not... you cannot be profitable." Nice to see a familiar name and shop in this months issue!! 

Awesome average RO stat btw. Someone contacted me today actually from R&W for one of the "solutions" articles. 

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      Click here to view the article
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