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I had a customer come in this week wanting the snow tires "HE" put on in November taken off. Not a bad Idea since we have had no snow this winter. When I saw his car I started to laugh, he had studded snow tire on his older buick. Take a look at the picture and you will see why I laughed. Not where the snow tires are !

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