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Extracareman

Any Alldata Management Users ?

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Hello Everybody,

 

We use Alldata Managment system and I'm trying to build packages using "Custom Jobs" then "Job Description". The problem is that it limits you to 255 characters which isn't nearly enough for most any job..

For example, I'm trying to make a custom job for a pre-purchase inspection but, again there isn't enough room to list everything we'd inspect during a prepurchase inspection..

Can anybody familiar with Alldata give me any hints on what I can do? How do you do it?

 

Thanks in Advance

 

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