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Hanjin Shipping files for bankruptcy in South Korea

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http://www.cnbc.com/2016/08/31/hanjin-shipping-vessel-unable-to-dock-at-south-korea-port-yonhap.html

 

 

The Korea International Trade Association said on Thursday that about 10 Hanjin vessels in China have been either seized or were expected to seized by charterers, port authorities or other parties. That adds to one other ship seized in Singapore by a creditor earlier this week.

The collapse comes at a time of high seasonal demand for the shipping industry ahead of the year-end holidays.

Freight rates on some routes where Hanjin operates many ships have surged.

The cost of shipping a 40-foot container on the Busan-Los Angeles route has jumped about 55 percent, from $1,100 to around $1,700, according to South Korea-based freight forwarder Pantos Logistics. Rates between South Korea and the U.S. east coast via Panama have risen about 50 percent to $2,400, it added. South Korea's maritime ministry said on Wednesday that Hanjin's woes would affect cargo exports for two or three months, with about 540,000 TEU of cargo already loaded on Hanjin vessels and facing delays.

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Get ready for tires and parts to go up in price.

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