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Mitchell1 and Shop Key Workshop Atlantic City NJ


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    • By Joe Marconi
      First, let me state that you need to treat every customer as if they are royalty. However, your existing customers have a relationship with you. They trust you and return to you for a number of reasons.
      The key to growing a business is to get NEW customers to return.  Survey after survey shows that customer retention greatly improves with each vehicle visit. So, you need to give your new customers a compelling reason to return.  Plus, you need a marketing plan that reaches out to your customers to keep your business top of mind. 
      What marketing strategies to you have that makes a great impression on new customers and makes them wanting to return?  
    • By spencersauto
      What's your houlr labor rate and where are you located? We're currently at $95 in Texas
    • By Joe Marconi
      For many shops, business during the winter can slow up due to a number of reasons.  What I have found that works is to schedule a flood of service reminders and past recommendations to go out during the months of Jan and Feb.  Maintaining touch with your existing customers is a great way to keep your shop top of mind, and it may just bring in a little extra work too.
      Any winter marketing tips to share? 
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      There is a large repair shop in the mid Atlantic states (they want to remain anonymous) that just formed an alliance with a local new car dealer to service their used cars.  I will change some of the details; a request from the shop owner. But, the story brings up a few interesting facts. And, the big news is: This shop is profiting from this relationship!
      The shop owner was approached by the GM of the dealer to service some of the used cars they have been taken in on trade and want to sell.  The dealer techs are not trained and not familiar with the different car lines, being a Chrysler-only dealership. Due to the shortage of cars these days, the dealer is taking in on trade, all makes and models and wants to sell the used cars. And we all know profitable used cars are. 
      The repair shop performs a multipoint, which they get paid for,  and then they do many of the services and repairs, which includes tires, brakes, wheel alignments, oil changes, air and cabin filters, wipers and other simple services. Most of the cars are newer cars, and the work can be done by a GS tech.
      I don't know the pricing, sorry.  But, I am interested to see where this goes.  
      Imagine, a new car dealer asking an independent repair shop to service and repair their used car fleet???
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      One of the lessons from COVID is for repair shops to have a strong cash reserve.  Shop owners need to budget their money each week, and allocate money to different bank accounts, such as payroll, operating expenses, taxes, etc.
      Another account I would recommend is to have a Cash Reserve account, where money is allocating each week, and not touched unless their is a emergency, such as an economic downturn and or if an economic emergency occurs in your area or with your company. 
      While no one could have predicted the affects from COVID 19, I think we can all agree that being cash strong is a viable strategy.
      You should have anywhere from 3 to 6 months of covered expenses in a separate bank account.  I know, I know....it's a lot of money. Start slow and build each week. Anything set aside is better than nothing. 
      Of course, to have a reserve means that you need to have the profit to put away. Right?  Well, another reason to know your numbers, revisit your pricing and make sure your labor rate is enough to support your payroll, operating expenses and have enough left over to set aside money for the unexpected.
      Trust me, you'll be glad you did. 
       


  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      Most of are familiar or use the more popular Automotive Business Management systems, such as MItchell 1 or RO Writer.  
      However, there is a lot of concern among many shop owners that these companies in particular are not meeting the needs for the modern automotive repair shop. 
      What system do you use and/or what systems have you checked into that look promising? 
       
    • Guest
      By Guest
      Hello,
      I am trying to get some real-world perspective on using the Mitchell 1 system. Specifically, I am trying to account for bad debt, but setting it up as a payment type doesn't seem to be a good idea because it shows in my Revenue reporting as a taxable sale. Is there any way to adjust this or is their a best practice for tracking bad debt?
      On another note, I would love to be able to chat with someone who has used this system for years and is willing to share some of their best practices in general. Let me know if you might be open to starting a dialogue.
      Thanks,
      Jim
    • By Oova At Autovitals
      The Digital Shop® takes shape in Schools
      Lindsay, our trainer extraordinaire went back to school. Not as a student but being a professor for two days at the Career and Technology Center Fort Osage. Based on the initiative of SmartFlow users in and around Kansas City, MO, Bill Lieb, and Bryan Compton – teachers of the Automotive Classes at CTC – AutoVitals provided equipment and training for the next generation automotive technicians.
      It has been an honor to support this initiative. The technician shortage and hesitance for new technology by older generation techs make it a necessity to have young technicians equipped with the knowledge about the tools available and how to use them. SmartFlow can not only guide these students to the digital frontier, but also learn about productivity and efficiency that is typically missing in everyday curriculum.
      As you can see in the pictures below, the students and Lindsay had a lot of fun with the lab portion of the training. Each group performed digital inspections on their vehicles, and expanded on the importance of documentation and pictures. Four classes in two days showed high school students the opportunity in this industry, both present and future. Professor Lindsay had a blast!
      Are you a School interested in taking your Automotive Program to the next level, or know of one? Please use our contact-us form to reach out!


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