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HarrytheCarGeek

DO YOU KNOW YOUR BUSINESS GOOD ENOUGH TO KNOW WHAT IS GOOD FOR YOU?

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DO YOU KNOW YOUR BUSINESS GOOD ENOUGH TO KNOW WHAT IS GOOD FOR YOU?

 

 

Has anyone called you selfish? Were you offended? Were your feelings hurt?

 

I am alarmed at the highly neglected conditions of over 60% of the vehicles going through my bays. Bald or completely worn tires, dangerously worn suspension components, that is to say, ball joints so worn that they could break upon hitting a pothole, shocks or struts that no longer damp, tie rods ready to pop if the tires are forced to turn against a curb.

 

In our state, the motor vehicle commissioner was delegated the duty to inspect vehicles for their operational conditions at least once a year, then it was increase to a biennial term, that is to say every two years, to eventual discontinuation of the safety portion of the inspection program on August 1, 2010. Now, all the commission does is check for the emissions system to be working.

 

When the New Jersey Repair Excellence Council (NJREC)voiced their concerns about the safety hazard the discontinuation of the safety inspection program may present to the public, they were dismissed as self interested money hungry leeches.

 

Not being politicians, NJREC failed to articulate their position well, clearly they have a vested interest in cars being maintained, but even more than that, their self-interest is one that benefits us all by keeping dangerous and ill cared for cars off the roads.

 

It is about time that those that care about the automotive industry came together and speak with one voice about our interests. You should not be ashamed to speak up for striving to prosper in an industry that provides an essential service to the community.

 

Other industries have hijacked the legislative process to deprive us of the much needed revenue to stay in business to provide an essential service to the community.

 

It's time we scrutinize our position and speak up for our self-interests and those of the community at large.

 

You have to be smart enough to know where is your bread buttered, and there is no shame to speak up for your self-interests where it benefits the whole society at large.

Edited by HarrytheCarGeek

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