Quantcast
Jump to content


HarrytheCarGeek

DO YOU KNOW YOUR BUSINESS GOOD ENOUGH TO KNOW WHAT IS GOOD FOR YOU?

Recommended Posts

DO YOU KNOW YOUR BUSINESS GOOD ENOUGH TO KNOW WHAT IS GOOD FOR YOU?

 

 

Has anyone called you selfish? Were you offended? Were your feelings hurt?

 

I am alarmed at the highly neglected conditions of over 60% of the vehicles going through my bays. Bald or completely worn tires, dangerously worn suspension components, that is to say, ball joints so worn that they could break upon hitting a pothole, shocks or struts that no longer damp, tie rods ready to pop if the tires are forced to turn against a curb.

 

In our state, the motor vehicle commissioner was delegated the duty to inspect vehicles for their operational conditions at least once a year, then it was increase to a biennial term, that is to say every two years, to eventual discontinuation of the safety portion of the inspection program on August 1, 2010. Now, all the commission does is check for the emissions system to be working.

 

When the New Jersey Repair Excellence Council (NJREC)voiced their concerns about the safety hazard the discontinuation of the safety inspection program may present to the public, they were dismissed as self interested money hungry leeches.

 

Not being politicians, NJREC failed to articulate their position well, clearly they have a vested interest in cars being maintained, but even more than that, their self-interest is one that benefits us all by keeping dangerous and ill cared for cars off the roads.

 

It is about time that those that care about the automotive industry came together and speak with one voice about our interests. You should not be ashamed to speak up for striving to prosper in an industry that provides an essential service to the community.

 

Other industries have hijacked the legislative process to deprive us of the much needed revenue to stay in business to provide an essential service to the community.

 

It's time we scrutinize our position and speak up for our self-interests and those of the community at large.

 

You have to be smart enough to know where is your bread buttered, and there is no shame to speak up for your self-interests where it benefits the whole society at large.

Edited by HarrytheCarGeek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • Goodyear exiting the repair business

      It seems that Goodyear corporate stores are changing their business model from Tire and Repair Service centers to strictly tires.   The franchise stores are free to continue their old business model.    Around here, the corporate stores are going to close down on January 27 for 2-3 weeks for a major remodel and possibly? rebranding.   They will sell tires and do alignments, but will not be able to align if they need repair parts.   I've not seen any official statements on this, so I don't really know more than the scuttlebutt. It looks like Hunter will have a great year this year as a result.  I saw a brand new Hunter Revolution tire machine in one of the local stores already. I stand to benefit from this change as we may see some of their repair business.   Since I don't sell tires, I'm not a Goodyear competitor, which allows them to safely refer repair business to us.   Almost everyone else around here sells tires.   We refer quite a few folks to tire-only stores, so Goodyear will now be on my referral list.

      By bantar, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 0 replies
      • 35 views
    • Article: Challenges Of The Auto Repair Business

      As the auto industry moves on into the modern age, repair centers all around the country are experiencing pressure with the tech world and our world colliding. We are all trailing nationwide franchises and dealerships that have endless resources working at their disposal. For most smaller auto repair businesses there isn’t enough time, money, or energy to attempt to constantly and actively secure the new business. We’re mostly worried about attempting to maintain the existing business we have, which has newer cars and increasing demands. Most of our time is now spent adjusting to the learning curve of advanced vehicle systems. However, that’s just a shop problem. The front office of your shop has its own issues to contend with that didn’t exist 15 years ago. Make no mistake about it, our industry is in the middle of a revolution and with 3D printing knocking at the door… the amount of balls to juggle are going to be considerable and it's all just getting started. Today’s auto repair businesses need to worry about the following: Location – Securing a proper location and the authorization to conduct business there over the long term ensures survival. Tools – Without the proper tools, we just can’t work on today’s vehicles. Training – Without the proper training, we put ourselves and our customers at high risk. Employee Engagement – Keeping your employees as interested in your success as you are is critical to the elements that keep people returning and employees from leaving. Employee Advancement – Providing an environment where employees know they can grow with your business, whether financially or moving up within the organization, is the key to keeping and securing talent. Marketing – This is the most complicated element in today’s world. It involves a mix of a strong web presence, good advertising ethics, social media profile, and following up with customers. Advertising – Can be expensive and very confusing. The best method to start is to get your feet wet with small budgets that keep your name in front of your potential customers, constantly. Software – Without good software, it is difficult to run any business. Good software is and always has been subjective. Our experiences indicate that good software saves you time and builds trust with your customers. Most importantly, it should work for you and not against you. This article originally published in CAR's News Section
      View full article

      By CAR_AutoReports, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 0 replies
      • 77 views
    • Business management training

      Have any of you attended classes or seminars put on by a company called ATI automotive training institute ? Was considering signing up for a 1 day class.

      By Bob K, in Workflow Management

      • 9 replies
      • 1,427 views
    • A FEW QUESTIONS FOR 4 BAY SHOP BUSINESS OWNERS

      How many of you have a four bay shop ? If you do how many techs do you have ? What is your average sales weekly , monthly ? What do you spend in advertising ? What was your sales in 2017 ? I am using this shop as a guide for those who would like to follow and see real time progress. For those interested just answer the questions so you and I can see what your strong points and if and where you may have areas for improvement.   

      By Stevens Automotive Service, in Shop Management Coaching, Business Training, Consulting

        
      • 2 replies
      • 720 views
    • Overtime without high production will hurt your shop's profit

      Not every shop pays flat rat; for many reasons.  So, many techs are on hourly pay.  There is nothing wrong with hourly pay, as long as you have an incentive program in place that promotes high production levels to avoid complacency.  For hourly paid employees I strongly urge you to have a pay plan that rewards production levels on a sliding scale.   As a business coach, I have seen too many times shops with low production levels and high tech payroll due to overtime pay. Overtime pay must not be used to get the jobs done with no regard to labor production.  Limit overtime and create a strategy that increases production and rewards techs with production bonuses.  By the way, there are many ways to incentivize techs, it's not all about money.  Overtime without high levels of production will eat into profits and if not controlled, with kill your business.  If your shop is an hourly paid shop, what incentives do you have in place to maintain production levels? 

      By Joe Marconi, in Accounting, Profitability, & Payroll

        
      • 0 replies
      • 332 views
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×