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2010 hyundai cam codes p0340 & 365 & no spark

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got a true nightmare. Replaced 2 broken timing chain guides in a 2010 Hyundai sonata with a 2.4. Now it wont start and im getting error codes p0340 & 365 and have no spark. My last tech walked off with my lab scope so finding waveforms is not happening. Car ran fine when arrived(other than noisy). Anyone ever come across this

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