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Is 2 A level techs to many


CAZM

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I have a opportunity to hire a second a level tech. Now here is my problem I only have 3 bays. I currently have 1 A level tech and a tire and oil change guy, and he will be moving to the front counter as my service advisor in January so I will have a spot to fill in the shop. I look at this 2 ways can I afford a 2nd A level tech with only 3 bays? Then I think this would really put a huge hurt on the place I hire him from which is my biggest competitor in town. He is probably the best tech in town and would bring a huge customer base with him. My future plans are to add on to the shop but I have at least 3 years till that happens.

 

 

What are your thoughts?

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You can't have too many top techs. Your much better off paying an A tech to do oil changes than to buy motors and advertising when the C tech greases up a steering wheel or double gaskets a filter.

 

3 bays, 2 techs will force them to work together, if both guys are on the same team it will work great.

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I have 2 a techs and 3 bays and I make more than when I had 2 b techs and 1a. If a car gets tied up because of parts or life, my tech can move over to the other rack and make me money.

 

It also means I have my best guys doing inspections which finds more work than a lube jockey. Imagine that, a skilled worker doing better than a lube jockey. I do have a lot gopher who shuttles customers and moves cars in/racks them so the techs can focus on just working and not wasting time to move cars out to get to that one car that's in the back lot abs no one can fond the keys.

 

So you have a chance to pick up an a tech, hurt your competition, and make more money. Seems pretty simple. Why does he want to leave where he is at now? Did you recruit him or did he come looking?

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You can't have too many top techs.

 

This is 100% true. I'm glad it didn't take 10 or 15 posts before this answer came.

Gather up every top tech that you can, just know that there is a huge skills shortage in this industry and top techs will become harder and harder to come by.

If you aren't making money off your top techs, either a) they aren't a top tech at all, or b ) you aren't charging enough for what they do.

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So you have a chance to pick up an a tech, hurt your competition, and make more money. Seems pretty simple. Why does he want to leave where he is at now? Did you recruit him or did he come looking?

 

 

He wants to leave because of the currant manager he is working for is a big you know. Which is good for me I have already hired 2 techs away form her. it like my one personal employment agency.

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