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HarrytheCarGeek

"It is lonely at the top" my friend used to say.

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I lost a very good friend last week, he passed away in his sleep. Very wealthy man, very generous. He used to tell me, "Harry, it is very lonely at the top, watch out for what you wish for."

 

I feel a tremendous sense of loss, and I didn't realize just how much or close we were. If I needed advise, I wouldn't hesitate to call him, and he wouldn't hesitate to take my call. The same thing with him, he would call me if he needed something that he couldn't do himself. But most important, we would just call each other to shoot the breeze and share ideas.

 

 

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