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Andre R

Bolt On Technology

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Is anybody using Bolt On with RO Writer. If so are you experiencing any conflcts or file corrupting. My RO Writer rep just told me not to use Bolt On as their system is rewriting /overwriting RO Writer code and corrupting files and data. This doesn't sound plausible but then again I have no idea how they get that little wizard in that black box on my desk to do what it does!

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