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Hey guys so I am working towards sitting down with an attorney and writing up a partnership agreement with my business partner, but I first need to sit down and talk everything out with him. Attached you will find a worksheet that directs us through a few of the considerations before we see the attorney.

 

I would really appreciate it if you could take a quick look at the worksheet and see if its missing anything in regards to an automotive shop partnership.

 

In return for your help feel free to download and keep a copy of this worksheet, and the new one if we find anything to change.

 

Thanks!

Partnership Worksheet.doc

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  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi
      I can't speak about all businesses in my area, but the repair shops are doing ok. In fact, most had a normal or near normal summer.  A few weeks back we had a major storm that knocked out power for nearly the week. That killed the week. But aside from that, we had a very good June, July and August.   With a miserable March and April, this was a great morale lift and financial boost.
      The only  down side is the affect COVID is having on other businesses, like restaurants, deli's, sport businesses and other businesses. Will this have a trickle down effect on our industry.  No one can tell for sure.
      I will be shoring up my finances and preparing for the unknown. 
       
       
       
    • By Alex
      Has the Coronavirus (COVID-19) impacted your auto shop business? If it hasn't yet, it has the potential to do so soon. Please share what you are currently doing, how your business is impacted, what plans you have in place, etc.
      Some things to consider:
      Do you have a plan in place should you or one of your employees become ill? With school, event, and business closures, how will this affect your shop? Are you sending anything to your customers in terms of sharing your plans around keeping your customer and employees healthy and doing your part in your community? Many small and large businesses have been sending email communications to their customers. Are you marketing to your customers in terms of not delaying car repair, should there be a need to temporarily close? Are your parts suppliers sharing their plans, should the pandemic affect supply chains?  Are you stocking up on business and shop necessities? Please share your experience in this topic and stay healthy!
      In the media:
      The coronavirus and its growing tally of sick and dead victims around the world have been roiling financial markets, prompting countless hand-washing reminders and ruining more than a few vacations, and that’s before anyone knows exactly how widespread the effect will be on the automotive industry, including your local repair shop. Source
      “By mid-March, the shortage of supplies will be felt and members are projecting they’ll experience disruption through May or June,” even if operations in China soon get back to normal, said Stacey Miller, senior director of communications at the Auto Care Association, a trade group representing 150,000 auto aftermarket and service businesses. Source
       


       
    • By Joe Marconi
      Today is the first day of summer, and we are still dealing with the dreaded COVID-19.  However, there are positive indicators that business will be better than expected this summer.  People will be taking more road trips, will avoid airplanes, trains and Ubers and will take to the roads in record numbers.
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    • By newport5
      Is your business down 40 or 50% like many on this forum?  If so, I have an idea to help a bit now, but especially in the future. And even help the impression of our industry.
       
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      I treat our customers like friends, like former high school friends. And these friends know we have to make a profit (EVERYBODY knows that!)
       
      For me, it’s a given that we’re going to take care of their car. If they tell me their dad just went into the hospital or nursing home, we’re done talking about their car.  I ask, “How’s dad?”
       
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      If their car came in with a problem, this is what will fix it (there’s no selling: this is the solution). I point out the other thing that needs attention now. There will be some explanation, but no selling: it needs it. No decision for the customer, actually.  Their car needs it.
       
      Next I say, “Here are the things that can wait six to nine months, but I want you to be aware so there are fewer surprises.” No selling, no decisions on their part. Plus, I’m the trustworthy guy who’s telling them they don’t need everything now.
       
      “Now let’s come up with a plan for these other things I found about your car.” I’m explaining, not selling. “You can do these now or in two or three months.” NOBODY wants to come back in two or three months so they are leaning in that direction, but no pressure from you.  They will probably ask; “What would you do?” I say, “If you hate bringing your car in, do it now.” (this is where you would bring in a little value, benefits and safety) Again, not selling, suggesting; letting them make the decision.  Notice that the first two issues didn’t involve them making a dreaded decision:  It needs this, doesn’t need that.
       
      If your inspection has 5 things, they will do 2 to 4. If the inspection has 8 things, they will do 3 to 5 – with no selling. You are their friend, you are advising. List everything!
       
      Now think about that phone call. There is only a little selling value or benefits: maybe some safety. So there’s no pressure on you, no bad news. You are the car detective, reading the cars clues and helping your friend thru this.
       
      When you take care of the customer in this fashion, you come from a place of trust, like taking care of a high school friend.
       
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    • By xrac
      Yesterday we removed a tail light to change a bulb! Surprise as this is what we found. Joe you may see a lot of this in the rust belt but here not so much. 



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    • By Alex
      Has the Coronavirus (COVID-19) impacted your auto shop business? If it hasn't yet, it has the potential to do so soon. Please share what you are currently doing, how your business is impacted, what plans you have in place, etc.
      Some things to consider:
      Do you have a plan in place should you or one of your employees become ill? With school, event, and business closures, how will this affect your shop? Are you sending anything to your customers in terms of sharing your plans around keeping your customer and employees healthy and doing your part in your community? Many small and large businesses have been sending email communications to their customers. Are you marketing to your customers in terms of not delaying car repair, should there be a need to temporarily close? Are your parts suppliers sharing their plans, should the pandemic affect supply chains?  Are you stocking up on business and shop necessities? Please share your experience in this topic and stay healthy!
      In the media:
      The coronavirus and its growing tally of sick and dead victims around the world have been roiling financial markets, prompting countless hand-washing reminders and ruining more than a few vacations, and that’s before anyone knows exactly how widespread the effect will be on the automotive industry, including your local repair shop. Source
      “By mid-March, the shortage of supplies will be felt and members are projecting they’ll experience disruption through May or June,” even if operations in China soon get back to normal, said Stacey Miller, senior director of communications at the Auto Care Association, a trade group representing 150,000 auto aftermarket and service businesses. Source
       


       
    • By Joe Marconi
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      As shop owners, we get caught up in the day-to-day struggles of running a business—sometimes at a cost to our families, friends and ourselves. We anguish over bad online reviews, disgruntled employees, slow days and declining car counts. We sometimes find it hard to sleep at night, reflecting over and over again in our minds, the problems of the day. And we repeat this cycle over and over, year after year. Let me tell you, no business issue is ever all that serious that it cannot be overcome. But, when life throws you a curveball, as in the case with Paul and Dave, those problems are not so easily overcome.
      There are many reasons why each of us go into business. For many of us, it’s the passion for the work we do. For others, it’s the burning desire to improve the automotive industry. While I cannot say that we are in perfect alignment in every area of business, I do know one thing with certainty: We all need to stop and reflect from time to time on all the things that have nothing to do with business, but everything to do with life itself. Those are the things that no amount of money can ever buy. Those are the things that are priceless.
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on June 1st, 2019


      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
    • By AutoShopOwner
      NEW YORK, March 27, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The global Automotive Repair & Maintenance Service Market is estimated to reach USD 810.30 Billion by 2026, according to a new report by Reports and Data. This can be mainly associated with the growing need for passenger’s safety. Increase in awareness related to vehicle maintenance and safety is expected to drive the market. Increased road safety awareness among the general population, the average maintenance and repair expenses by an individual are anticipated to drive the market. Moreover, an increase in sales of used cars in many regions, especially in emerging economies; technological advancements pertaining to vehicle safety, are also fuelling market growth. Furthermore, cost effectiveness, availability of service flexibility and reliable maintenance services are also propelling the market growth globally. Based on statistics, increase in average age of vehicle due to technological advancements and the average miles driven per vehicle are also significant factors stimulating market demand.
      North America region is projected to grow at a CAGR of 5.8% during the forecast period with the largest share of 32.50% in 2018. The improving countries are the primary consumers of vehicles in this region. The Automotive repair & maintenance service market in the Asia Pacific has been expanding owing to the rise in technological advances in the area.
      Request for a sample of this research report at: https://www.reportsanddata.com/sample-enquiry-form/1158
      Further key findings from the report suggest
      In the Automotive Repair & Maintenance service Market, the tire segment accounts for the largest share of 33.48% in 2018 due to the growing extensive use of vehicles for other daily purposes. Tire services include tire pressure monitoring, replacement of tires, repair of flat tires and misalignment of tires. Battery services cover replacement of automotive batteries. Wear and tear parts include brake wheel end, shock absorbers, driveline, engine, and suspension. Collision body includes crash parts, coating and painting, refinishing and repair materials. In terms of service providers, the automotive repair and maintenance services market is segmented as an automotive dealership, locally owned repair shops, general franchise repairs, and others. The automotive dealership segment is estimated to drive the growth of the market. Presence of various locally owned repair shops is also growing at a significant rate due to the increase in inclination of consumers toward the locally owned shops. Based on service type, the car maintenance service type is valued at USD 299.88 billion in 2018 and is estimated to reach USD 478.08 billion by 2026 at a CAGR of 5.8% during the forecast period. Some of the trending possibilities in the automotive repair and maintenance services market are an inclination towards the adoption of remote vehicle diagnostics system and collaboration & partnership between small locally owned repair shops & fleet and leasing firms. APAC is considered to be the second largest market for automotive repair and service market with revenue of USD 140.39 billion in 2018 and is estimated to reach USD 218.78 billion by 2026 at a CAGR of 5.5%, due to the presence of several automotive hubs in the region. Moreover, large consumption of passenger vehicle across Asia Pacific is also driving the growth. Europe is estimated to grow at a CAGR 4.4%, during the forecast period. Key participants include Arnold Clark Automobiles Limited, Driven Brands, Inc., Ashland Automotive, Inc., Asbury Automotive Group, Inc., Belron International Ltd., Carmax Autocare Center, Jiffy Lube International, Inc., Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Halfords Group Plc., Firestone Complete Auto Care. Read more at: https://www.reportsanddata.com/report-detail/automotive-repair-and-maintenance-service-market
      For the purpose of this report, Reports and Data have segmented global Automotive Repair & Maintenance service Market on the basis of Parts, Application, Service type, Technology, Service provider and region:
      Parts Outlook (Volume, Thousand Units; and Revenue, USD Million; 2016-2026)
      Tires Wear and tear parts Collision body Batteries Others Service Type Outlook (Volume, Thousand Units; and Revenue, USD Million; 2016-2026)
      Car Maintenance Services Car Repair Service Application Outlook (Volume, Thousand Units; and Revenue, USD Million; 2016-2026)
      Passenger vehicle Commercial vehicle Mechanical Technology Outlook (Volume, Thousand Units; and Revenue, USD Million; 2016-2026)
      Microcomputers Aluminum Wireless Others Ask for Discount at: https://www.reportsanddata.com/discount-enquiry-form/1158
      Service provider Outlook (Volume, Thousand Units; and Revenue, USD Million; 2016-2026)
      Automobile dealerships General franchise repairs Specialty shops Locally owned repair Shops Others Regional Outlook (Volume, Thousand Units; and Revenue, USD Million; 2016-2026)
      North America U.S.
        Europe Germany UK
        Asia Pacific China India South-east Asia
        Latin America Brazil
        MEA Browse More Reports of Automotive and Transportation Category At: https://www.reportsanddata.com/report/category/automotive-services
      About Reports and Data
      Reports and Data is a market research and consulting company that provides syndicated research reports, customized research reports, and consulting services. Our solutions purely focus on your purpose to locate, target and analyze consumer behavior shifts across demographics, across industries and help client’s make a smarter business decision. We offer market intelligence studies ensuring relevant and fact-based research across a multiple industries including Healthcare, Technology, Chemicals, Power, and Energy. We consistently update our research offerings to ensure our clients are aware about the latest trends existent in the market. Reports and Data has a strong base of experienced analysts from varied areas of expertise.
      Contact Us:
      John Watson
      Head of Business Development
      Reports And Data | Web: www.reportsanddata.com
      Direct Line: +1-800-819-3052
      E-mail: [email protected]
    • By Joe Marconi
      I will never forget the day I met Carlos. It was 13 years ago at a small business conference in New York City. The conference drew business owners from all types of industries throughout the greater New York area. Carlos was sitting next to me at orientation. The day was lined up with guest speakers, workshops and networking opportunities. By the third networking break, Carlos and I were hitting it off. We traded war stories, discussed business challenges and brainstormed new ideas. Carlos owns two Italian restaurants, one in Manhattan and the other in Brooklyn. His first restaurant was founded in 1986 when he was 27 years old. I finally asked Carlos, “What’s your background? Did you go school to become a chef? Did your family own a restaurant? Do you enjoy cooking?” Carlos turned to me, smiled, and said, “Joe, I am going to let you in on a little-known secret: I have never cooked a meal in my life.”
      Unlike Carlos and his business venture, most auto repair businesses are started by technicians and use their technical skills to run their companies. I was one of them. I spent years honing my technical skills from the time I graduated high school in 1973 to my first day in business, Oct. 1, 1980. I worked hard at becoming the absolute best automotive technician I could possibly become. I also spent another decade after starting my business improving those skills. That is, until one day I realized that while I may have used my technical skills to start and initially build my business, it wasn’t enough.
      In the first 10 years, I grew my business primarily with my hands, my strength and my determination. At the end of that decade, I hit a wall. Thankfully, that wall knocked some sense into me. My business was largely dependent on my abilities and what I could produce. After analyzing my business and realizing that it had plateaued for a number of years, I had to make a tough choice. It was time to put down the tools. I had to learn a different set of skills—the skills of running a company. This proved to be the right choice for me.
      I’m not saying I regret what I did in those early years. I didn’t know any other way. I loved the auto industry and I loved working on cars. However, when the day came that I decided to become a business owner, my life changed. And, my awareness of how to build and run a business should have changed with it.
      There are shop owners that were never technicians, and do quite well. It’s argued that they have an advantage over technician-turned-shop-owners. A technician’s brain is wired to look at the problem at hand, create a solution and move on. An entrepreneur looks at business from a different perspective: always looking to the future, at growth and what other greater things can be accomplished.
      I remember many years ago meeting a very successful shop owner from the west coast at a trade show. We were both standing at a booth that displayed emissions-related products. I picked up a sensor, turned to this shop owner and asked what he thought of the new air fuel ratio sensors. He replied, “I wouldn’t know an oxygen sensor from a spark plug.” I kept silent. This shop owner was, and still is, well known in the industry—and very successful.
      Here’s the bottom line: As a business owner, the skills of repairing cars have little to do with the skills needed for long-term business success. For many of you with a technical background, you may have come to the same conclusion. If you have not come to this realization, please take a long hard look at your life and your business. While you may love to be in the bays, your place it a helm of the ship. Use those technical skills, but understand that those skills may have gotten you this far, but they won’t get your business to where it needs to be. It will be your business skills and people skills that builds a sustainable company that continues to grow and becomes a source of enrichment for you, your family, your employees and their families.
      Carlos and I still keep in contact with each other and he still owns and operates his restaurants. Carlos called me the other day and told me that he actually had the opportunity recently to work in the kitchen at one of his restaurants. Perhaps even entrepreneurs can cross over into the world of technicians. I’m betting it did a world of good for Carlos.
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on November 1st, 2018


      View full article
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