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alfredauto

Frozen batteries

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Is there any hope for frozen batteries? Lately we have been dealing with fairly new units in college kids cars that got discharged over a couple weeks and froze. I'm tempted to defrost them in the shop and see if they'll take a charge, my tech says forget about it they are garbage. Apparently -26 degrees will freeze a battery with 12.2v. Did I mention I'm done with winter?

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