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NEW Ford VCM-II Scan Tool

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NEW FORD VCM-II: $2495.00

 

IDS License: $750.00

 

http://www.oescantools.com/FordVCM2.html

 

The Ford VCM II the authentic Ford OEM diagnostics scan tool that works with the Ford IDS diagnostics application running on a PC to diagnose Ford, Lincoln and mercury vehicles.

 

The VCM II offers:

  • Authentic OEM diagnostics for Ford, Lincoln and Mercury Vehicles.
  • Customer Flight Recorder (CFR) functionality with an optional pendant cable.
  • Industry standardized J1962 Data Link Connector (DLC) and USB cables.
  • Four LED indicators and signaling device providing technician with continuous visual as well as audible operating status.
  • Enhanced 802.11 wireless that minimizes dependencies on service department wireless capability infrastructure.
  • Improved durability.
  • SmartPower Management system to protect the VCM II in extreme environments. Integration with IDS:
  • New wireless software integrated with IDS installation package.
  • Wireless functionality preferred for all IDS functions including module reprogramming. USB wired connections are only required to update the VCM II loaded code and to set up the VCM II to function as a Customer Flight Recorder.
  • CFR option added to provide legacy and future vehicle coverage.

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