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Flash Sale + Social Proof


Flash Sale + Social Proof


Flash Sale + Social Proof

Concise Tech Handbook


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Morning, I am still working the offsite owner gig and have ran into many more battles ( Joe Warned me ) than I thought I would but I am still winning the war. Security camera system with remote access is helping ALOT. Anyways my lead tech ( rocket scientist :lol: , actually he used to be) says the verbage in my tech handbooks seems to ramble on and needs to be more concise. While I am good at fixing cars, employees, etc. my writing skills could use some improvement. This handbook by the way covers how repairs are excepted to be done ( Brake checks, ball joint checks, leak checks etc. ) so it is not your typical handbook covering dress codes etc. Anybody know of any software or anything that's out there that could help me. Let me know and enjoy your weekend, Mike.

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I told you so. Just kidding.

 

I don't know of any software for what you are referring to. Most shops built there own checklists that are specific to their shop. If you are building repair procedures, I could see how that can get a little lengthy. I think that should be left to the information systems we have access to: Alldata, Mitchell Repair, Identifix, Etc.

 

Procedures, polices and checklists are to systemize the workflow process to bring consistency to the workflow. Most important are diagnostic inspections that are specific to your shop. Other procedures include the workflow process from vehicle write up, to dispatch, vehicle inspection, quality control, and then car delivery.

 

You should even have a checklist for facility maintenance. Check the entire building, lighting, equipment operation, lifts, etc.

 

I think you are the right track. For the business to run without you, you need every aspect of the day to day operations clearly systemized. But don't overdue it if repair procedure are already published. Just have a process in place that for certain jobs (such as a heater core) the tech must refer to the repair manual.

 

I hope this helps.

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I told you so.  Just kidding.

 

I don't know of any software for what you are referring to. Most shops built there own checklists that are specific to their shop. If you are building repair procedures, I could see how that can get a little lengthy.  I think that should be left to the information systems we have access to: Alldata, Mitchell Repair, Identifix, Etc. 

 

Procedures, polices and checklists are to systemize the workflow process to bring consistency to the workflow.  Most important are diagnostic inspections that are specific to your shop. Other procedures include the workflow process from vehicle write up, to dispatch, vehicle inspection, quality control, and then car delivery.

 

You should even have a checklist for facility maintenance.  Check the entire building, lighting, equipment operation, lifts, etc.

 

I think you are the right track. For the business to run without you, you need every aspect of the day to day operations clearly systemized. But don't overdue it if repair procedure are already published. Just have a process in place that for certain jobs (such as a heater core) the tech must refer to the repair manual. 

 

I hope this helps.

That's exactly what I'm looking for! Let me know when you publish it lol

We're trying to write one up but it seems to be an ongoing process.

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk

 

 

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Thanks for all the replies. First off, I am definitely finding that this was the best business move I have ever made ( getting out of the back room). Looking from the outside in, has gave me a much different perspective, much like a business consultant .I have remodeled the waiting room ( 5 compliments this past week, mostly women) , I changed policy concerning safety issues , tightened up control over the cash coming in and out of the shop, started calling back customers again and not relying on emails to check customer satisfaction, changed a lot of my marketing techniques and joined this GREAT website. In my original post about the handbook, I misstated when I said " how repairs are excepted to be done ", I meant how inspections or diagnostics should be done. I think the problem is, I wrote the handbooks ( a lot of them and now even a lot more coming ) from my experience ( 30 plus years) and tend to go on and on and on, on how I came to the conclusion that this is the way the inspections or diagnostics should be done for shop efficiency. MAP has good guidelines, but most their guidelines are to broad, so to cover every vehicle ( we service mostly SUV's and 4wd vehicles because of our rural location in the foothills outside of Denver). I think I will have someone that knows nothing about how to do auto inspections or diagnostics look at it ( like my wife) and see what she reads into it. I will keep you guys updated. Thanks, Mike.

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