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Letting a customer leave with non functioning TPMS?


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Customer makes and appointment to swap wheels on a 335i (he has the tires already mounted).

 

Vehicles comes in with the TPMS light flashing and an obvious issue with the system. The new wheels don't even have sensors installed. We ask the customer what he wants to do and inform him that to get the TPMS system working we would have to dismount all 8 tires and see what it is reusable and what isn't. Customer declines as it doesn't fit in his budget (yes drives a 20k+ used car but doesn't have a few hundred bucks to fix properly). We notate this on his RO and let him leave.

 

Was thinking this morning, was this the right course of action? Any way I could be held liable if anything happens say a flat tire and an accident?

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Did you know that it's the same principle and law for air bag systems? Have worked at a few places in the past that would let them leave.....I try to keep myself well informed of any laws. Being an independent shop, there would be no one to blame but myself.

Edited by ATSAutomotive
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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         1 comment
      Have I got your attention? Great.
      Let me start by saying that I believe in giving praise when deserved and letting employees know when they dropped the ball. However, the truth is that no one enjoys being reprimanded or told they messed up.  
      The question is, what is the appropriate balance between the right amount of praise and the right amount of critical feedback? According to studies done by Harvard Business School, the ratio of praise to critical feedback should be about 6:1 – Six praises for every critical feedback. I am not sure if I agree with that.
      From personal experience, I would recommend a lot more praise. The exact ratio doesn’t matter. What’s important is that before you consider giving critical feedback, ensure you have given that employee a lot of recent praise. If not, whatever you are trying to get through to an employee, will fall on deaf ears.
      When you do have to give critical feedback, remember a few things:
      Focus on the issue or behavior; never attack the person, and remain calm in your actions and words Ask the employee for feedback, their side of the story Speak to the employee in private Address the issue soon after it happens; never wait Don’t rely on second-hand information; it’s always better if you have experienced the situation yourself that you want to correct Have an open discussion and find things that both of you can agree upon Have an action plan moving forward that the employee can take ownership of Use the experience as a learning tool Make sure you bring up positive attributes about them Remember, you don’t want the employee to be angry or upset with you; you want them to reflect on the situation and what can be improved. One last thing. Everyone makes mistakes. We need to be mindful of this.
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