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OBD Locator - WIKI OBD Diagnostic Socket Locator

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Have you ever been out trying to locate a diagnostic socket, spent 5 minutes or more hunting around, taking off panels, unscrewing parts of the car, called a friend to see if they might know ? and it took you longer to find the socket than it did to diagnose the problem.

I am sure we have all been there.

Well now there is a simple and easy way to locate the location of the diagnostic socket and the great thing is, its FREE !

Initially the web site has been populated with mostly cars, but additional locations for Trucks, Boats and Motorcycles will be added.

It will save you time and money, and some embarrassment in front of the customer!

 

Hope this helps:

www.wikiobd.co.uk

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