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Joe Marconi

Hyundai Elantra: Gas Spilling out of Filler Neck

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We recently installed a new gas tank in a 2002 Hyundai Elantra. The old tank was rusted badly and leaking. About 2 weeks later the customer called us to tell us that after she filled the tank; gas came gushing out of the filter neck spilling onto the car and the ground.

 

We called the company that supplied us with the tank and they told us that they never heard of that. We also called the local dealer and he told us the same thing.

 

We had the customer bring the car in, we took it to the gas station ourselves, filled the tank, the gas nozzle clicked off and a moment later about a two quarts of gas came gushing out.

 

We removed the tank, check all the vents, lines and hoses and ordered a new tank. After doing some research, the tech on this job found a diagram of the tank showing all the components of the tank and everything hooked up to it. Inside the neck of the tank there is a fuel shut off valve. It’s pressed into the neck. We did not see any valve in either the tank we installed or in the new tank.

 

After a lengthy call to the local Hyundai dealer, the parts guy found the part number and ordered it. He said he never heard of the valve and according to his records, never sold one either.

 

We got the valve, but it would not fit into the neck of the tank. We had to carefully file the neck until we were able to press it into the tank. My assumption is that the old valve was never seen by the tech who installed the tank originally and was discarded along with the tank.

 

I am sharing this with everyone as a word of caution and education. We called the tank company, he was very grateful to hear we solved the problem.

 

My problem; paying for this “education”.

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