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And the results are in...


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If you’ll recall, a couple weeks ago I asked for your help and asked you to watch two new video trailers that I’m considering using to promote my upcoming Auto Repair Event in Las Vegas this October. In case you missed it, you can watch them by CLICKING HERE

 

Thank you to all 1123 of you that watched the videos so far and special thanks go to the 86 folks that responded on the blog or via email with their opinions regarding which was the right video to use. The results were very interesting and instructive because they were split evenly 3 ways: 1/3 preferred the first video; 1/3 preferred the second; 1/3 liked both but either couldn’t make up their minds or they wanted elements of both to be used in the final video. A few of you even used very strong words to convey the strong opinions you felt about each video; love, hate, awesome, crap, nails-on-a-chalkboard, etc.

 

So what have I learned from this? First, even though I’m sure most of you had an opinion which video you liked best, only a small percentage were willing to tell me what it was. How many opinions – good or bad – are you NOT hearing from your clients about your services? Whatever you’re hearing, multiply them by 10??

 

Second, as long as the marketing strategy is solid, there is more than one right way to get it done. In my case, I’ll need to use both trailers, otherwise I’ll risk alienating the 1/3 of my audience that would have preferred the other video. How many ways are you advertising your specials? Are you stuck on the same message and using it over and over? If so, you may be losing 1/3 to 1/2 of your audience because they’d prefer a different message or a different way of being contacted by you.

 

Third, over 1000 folks watched the videos, so I know that a good portion of my audience is willing and able to watch videos online. If your clients are getting online, how much effort are you putting forth to use this totally free way to market your services to your prospects and to stay in contact with your current clients? (Here’s my shameless plug: If you want to discover how to market your auto repair biz online for a teeny-tiny fraction of what you may be spending to do it offline, you definitely need to be at this year’s EVENT! I’ll be showing you in very simple terms how easy it is to do it, or how to get it done for you.)

 

Finally, test! For the cost of a few hours of my time and a free email, I found out that I’m on the right track. I received a lot of constructive comments, got a lot of folks excited about attending the Event, and heard from a lot of old clients that have been out of the loop for a while. If you’re going to try an unproven marketing strategy with your clients, test it small first. If the results are good, quickly roll it out to the rest of your list. If it fails, you’ve learned what NOT to do, plus you’ve saved a lot of time and money too!

 

Best,

Ron Ipach

CinRon Marketing Group

www.TheAutoRepairEvent.com

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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