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Joe Marconi

Be Active in Your Community

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The local Chamber of Commerce will host a business expo in my area next week. This will be the third year I will be involved. Local business can purchase a booth a showcase their business. The expo has proven to be a valuable source of new customer contacts and gives me a chance to talk with existing customers in a more relaxed setting.

 

My table is filled with brochures and information on my company plus we raffle off oil changes throughout the day. It’s an enjoyable day and rewarding.

 

Being involved with the community in any fashion is a great way to promote your business.

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