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Joe Marconi

Handling Intermittent Problems

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My service writers struggle when charging for interment problems, especially when the problem cannot be duplicated. Here my policy:

 

“Mrs. Customer, unfortunately we cannot duplicate the problem you are experiencing, but would like to perform a few tests based on the symptoms you describe. These tests may help us by analyze the problem and will let us know if all the major functions of your on board computer, fuel system and ignition system are working properly, The cost for these test is “X” dollars. Remember Mrs. Customer, the problem is not occurring at this time and further testing may be required”.

 

I would like to hear how you handle this and your policy.

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