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Gas Station Owners: What does Your Future Look like?


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I think in the short term, the internal combustion engine is not going anywhere soon. But what about the long term?  If the electric vehicle is to become the dominant vehicle model in the future, how does that change the traditional gas station business? 

I think it would be interesting to hear from our fellow gas station shop owners, and how they view their future. 

 

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Start LLC for $0 at IncFile


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It certainly seems that our current administration would love to see the EV’s dominate our country as soon as possible. They fail to acknowledge regardless of the fact that the required infrastructure of charging stations fail to exist. Hour many current repair facilities have the required training and expertise to repair EV’s? This push to replace internal combustion vehicles will no doubt cause some unintended consequences. Many underground storage tanks were replaced during 1980’s to meet new, stricter, Underground Storage Tank regulations. These 40 year old tanks will need to be replaced again very soon. How many locations will be willing to invest $400,000 to $500,000 to remove and replace their tanks knowing the uncertainty of the business? Due to the current high cost to purchase an electric vehicle, the affluent areas will see the change over to EV’s sooner than lower income areas. Expect to see low volume stations that are located in affluent areas closing rather than risk high debt with little or no chance of recouping their investment. I feel like a blacksmith watching the first horseless carriages roll into town. The strong will survive but there will be many casualties along the way.

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8 hours ago, JimO said:

It certainly seems that our current administration would love to see the EV’s dominate our country as soon as possible. They fail to acknowledge regardless of the fact that the required infrastructure of charging stations fail to exist. Hour many current repair facilities have the required training and expertise to repair EV’s? This push to replace internal combustion vehicles will no doubt cause some unintended consequences. Many underground storage tanks were replaced during 1980’s to meet new, stricter, Underground Storage Tank regulations. These 40 year old tanks will need to be replaced again very soon. How many locations will be willing to invest $400,000 to $500,000 to remove and replace their tanks knowing the uncertainty of the business? Due to the current high cost to purchase an electric vehicle, the affluent areas will see the change over to EV’s sooner than lower income areas. Expect to see low volume stations that are located in affluent areas closing rather than risk high debt with little or no chance of recouping their investment. I feel like a blacksmith watching the first horseless carriages roll into town. The strong will survive but there will be many casualties along the way.

Great perspective! Our current administration should contact people like you! 

The economics involved to invest in the future of a typical gas station, especially to replace underground tanks, is overwhelming to many. 

Even with this big push for EVs, there are so many hurdles to overcome.  

The blacksmith analogy is something I agree with. However, many smart blacksmiths became our first auto technicians and repair shops. 

 

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