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We want to do a short survey with our customers to gauge their reaction to newer trends in the repair of their car. We are only going to ask 4 Questions so  that we can share the results on this forum and have other shops do the same.

The 4 questions we thought of :  still working of exact wording so help is appreciated.

1.  - Personal Service Adviser to talk too.    VS  Virtual Artificial Intellegent service advisor ( no human interaction )

2. - Check in with a Personal service advisor    VS  using a digital check in like Mc Donalds uses to take your order inside their restaurant  then leave keys 

3.- Personal phone call or text with updates and for authorization   VS  Computer generated text for updates and authorization 

4. Personal phone call or text  with Pictures sent as needed  (trust in your shop)    VS  digital inspection form and pictures sent each time their vehicle is brought in 

 

Your input is important so we can all ask the same questions to help us keep our businesses thriving.

One example of a survey we did a few years ago was would you like us to have a quick lube bay for  fast in and out service or Leave your vehicle for the day for the LOF  96 % of our customers wanted to leave their cars so they could get a non rushed check over of the vehicle while it was there. 

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