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6 Michigan auto repair shops, dealerships were suddenly forced to close


AutoShopOwner

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Six metro Detroit auto repair shops and dealerships are under fire by the Michigan Secretary of State for allegedly not being in compliance with state regulations.

Two repair shops were ordered to cease and desist from conducting business. The agency also summarily suspended the business registrations of four other facilities.

According to a news release from the agency, the cease and desist orders were issued to:

  • Star Motor Auto Repair, 21579 Schoenherr Road, Warren, owned by Jack Musa. The facility allegedly performed brake, electrical system and tune-up repairs without a certified mechanic. A regulation agent discovered Musa’s mechanic certification had expired, the agency said, but he was continuing to repair vehicles. Star Motors' telephone number has been disconnected and Musa could not be reached for comment.
  • MC Auto Repair, 1650 Waterman St., Detroit, owned by Michael Castro, for allegedly operating without certified mechanics. A regulation agent completed an inspection at the facility Dec. 11, the agency said, and found Castro, whose certification had expired in July 2005, performing repairs. Castro met with department staff at a preliminary conference in January, and the temporary cease and desist order was issued Feb. 8. Castro could not be reached for comment. MC Auto Repair's number is not in service and the facility is marked "closed" on Yelp.

The cease and desist orders prohibit the businesses from performing any more repairs until the facility complies with state law.

The agency also suspended the registrations of the following businesses:

  • VAN Car Co., 7101 E. Eight Mile Road, Warren, owned by Nadhem Shaiya, was suspended March 15. The dealership no longer is operating at its registered address and failed to notify the department’s Business Compliance and Regulation Division of a change of address. A preliminary conference was scheduled for Feb. 12, but the dealership owner failed to attend. Shaiya could not be reached for comment.
  • Witko Group Inc., 33457 Gratiot Ave., Clinton Township, owned by Don Witkowski, was suspended March 18. A regulation agent attempted to conduct a lot and records inspection Feb. 6 and again Feb. 7, but the dealership was closed with no sign or hours posted. Witkowski told the Free Press on Friday that a dealership is not at the site. He said he owns the building, in which there is a separately operated auto repair business. Witkowski also said he is unaware of any suspension and has not been contacted by the secretary of state. 
  • Mogul Trading, 2801 S. Beech Daly St., Dearborn Heights, owned by Milton Small, was suspended March 8. Lot and records inspections were attempted Jan. 16 and again Jan. 28. The dealership wasn’t open during posted business hours and couldn’t be inspected. Small could not be reached for comment.
  • Superior Plus Auto Sales Inc., 10614 Joy Road, Detroit, owned by Ghada Chokr, was suspended March 8. A regulation agent attempted a lot and records inspection Jan. 16 and again Jan. 28. The dealership wasn’t open during posted business hours and couldn’t be inspected. Chokr could not be reached for comment.
  • The dealerships may regain their license if they show they’ve complied with the law. 

Consumers can verify whether the repair shop they are using is registered with the state by using the online search tool at ExpressSOS.com and clicking “Business Services” and then “Repair Facility Services.”

News Source: https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2019/03/29/michigan-auto-repair-shop-dealerships/3301802002/

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There is no excuse for any repair shop in Michigan to operate without licensed mechanics.  Sure some of the certification areas require retesting but the mechanic certification is only $20 per year.  There is no reason that a mechanic can't maintain their certification if they are competent and worth being employed.  The shops were willfully not in compliance.  I am glad they were shut down.

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